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The Mysterious Marree Man of Outback Australia: Largest Geoglyph in the World

The Mysterious Marree Man of Outback Australia: Largest Geoglyph in the World



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By April Holloway | Epoch Times

Etched into the dry sand of Australia’s barren outback is the world’s largest geoglyph, known as “Marree Man,” an enormous figure of an Aboriginal man hunting birds or wallabies with a throwing stick. Unlike other anthropomorphic geoglyphs found around the world, which were constructed by ancient civilizations, Marree Man was carved into the landscape only 22 years ago. However, its very existence presents one of the greatest mysteries Australia has ever seen; the geoglyph is so large that it is viewable from space, yet not a single witness can attest to its creation, and to this day, its creator and the reason for its construction remain unknown.

The Marree Man geoglyph lies on a plateau of arid land, approximately 60 kilometers (37 miles) west of the tiny township of Marree (population = 60) in South Australia. Trevor Wright, a charter pilot, was flying between the townships of Marree and Coober Pedy on June 26, 1998 , when he spotted the immense figure in the landscape below.

The desolate road to Marree, close to where the famous geoglyph known as “Marree Man” was discovered. ( Don Shearman / CC BY NC SA 2.0 )

The figure is 4.2 kilometers (2.6 miles) tall with a perimeter of 15 by 28 kilometers (9.3 by 17.4 miles). At the time of discovery, the outline was 30 centimeters (12 inches) deep and up to 35 meters (114 feet) wide. Surveyors speculate that the figure was made by a bulldozer and could have taken weeks to complete, yet no one claims to have seen or heard a thing. Only one track led into and out of the site, but no footprints or tire marks were discernible, and a thorough police investigation conducted at the time came up with nothing.

Marree Man, South Australia, June 28, 1998. ( Public Domain )

Puzzling Clues

Not long after its discovery, several press releases were sent to the media from an anonymous source. A number of features of the writing seemed to point to a foreign author. For a start, the letter quoted measurements in miles, yards, and inches, instead of in the metric system , which is used in Australia. Furthermore, a number of phrases and names, such as “Queensland Barrier Reef” and “local Indigenous Territories,” are not terms used by Australians.

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Adding to the mystery, a handful of peculiar items were found in a small pit at the site, including a satellite photo of the figure, a jar containing a small flag of the United States, and a note which referred to the Branch Davidians, a cult group that was based on a property near Waco, Texas , which was raided in 1993, leading to the death of the cult leader David Koresh, as well as 82 other Branch Davidian followers.

In January, 1999, officials found a small plaque buried close to the nose of the figure. It was an American flag with an imprint of the Olympic rings and a quote from “The Red Centre” by H. H. Finlayson, which read: “In honour of the land they once knew. His attainments in these pursuits are extraordinary; a constant source of wonderment and admiration.”

The quote came from a page that describes the hunting of wallabies with throwing sticks and contained photographs of hunters that looked similar to the Marree Man.

Investigators tried, unsuccessfully, to piece together this odd collection of clues. However, some suggested that they may have all been planted as red herrings, to divert attention away from the real creator.

An illustration showing the outline of Marree Man by Lisa Thurston, 2005. ( )

Marree Man Theories

Rumors were quick to spread around the tiny town of Marree. Some suggested that the creation of the geoglyph was a stunt pulled by a local scenic flight operator, who served to profit from the tourism generated by its discovery. Indeed, local charter planes found themselves working overtime to meet the demand for joy rides to see the spectacular figure on the ground below.

Other theories began circulating that Marree Man was the work of extraterrestrials or a warning to politician Pauline Hanson regarding racist comments made about Australian Aborigines.

A more plausible theory is that it was crafted by Bardius Goldberg, an Australian artist, who had expressed interest in creating a work visible from space. When questioned about it, he would neither confirm nor deny that he had created the Marree Man. Goldberg passed away before this theory could be fully investigated.

What’s Next for the Famous Marree Man?

The giant geoglyph of the Marree Man was quick to become an icon of the small South Australian township and a popular tourist destination , but the famous carving was fading, fast.

While the site has never been accessible to the general public as it falls on Native title lands, the geoglyph began slowly fading through natural erosion. It was only a matter of time before the famous figure disappeared forever, taking the secrets of its creation along with it.

In 2013, NASA reported that the outline of the man was barely visible from the images collected by OLI on Landsat 8. This prompted locals to act. A 5-day project used GPS coordinates and a construction grader to create wind grooves in the geoglyph. There’s hope that vegetation will grow in those grooves – which means that the famous Marree Man may be green in the future.


Who created the Marree Man in Australia’s Outback?

He is the world’s biggest geoglyph and yet he was discovered by accident. The giant man, however, is 4.2 km tall and measures an impressive perimeter of 28 km. If you are standing right in front one of the up to 35 m long and almost 30 cm deep lines, you won’t necessarily realize their extraordinary nature. The mysterious Marree Man only reveals his identity from above.


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They used a construction grader to carve the lines back into the ground at a deeper level than before.

This was intended to minimize wind degradation and to trap water that they hope will eventually cause vegetation to grow in the grooves and turn the Man green.

No one knows who created the Marree Man, nor why, but anyone who can answer that question will be eligible to win a $5,000 cash reward

In the course of restoring the original, the crew also found more than 250 bamboo stakes placed at 30 foot intervals.

They speculated these bamboo stakes had been used by the original creator as a guide to mark out the first carvings.

Even still, no one knows for certain how the Marree Man was first created nor why.

In 1999, a year after the carvings were first discovered, a series of anonymous faxes were sent to local officials, pointing to an area near the Man’s head where a plaque had been left featuring the American flag, Olympic rings and a quote from a book about aboriginal hunting practices.

A number of people from the region have claimed the whole ordeal was engineered by artist Bardius Goldberg, who is said to have admitted responsibility on his deathbed in 2002.

There is currently a $5,000 cash reward for anyone who is able to offer concrete evidence to prove the origin of the carving.

ORIGINS OF THE MARREE MAN

The creators of the Marree Man remain unknown, but some believe the late South Australian artist Bardius Goldberg is responsible for creating the figure after talking to his friends about the artwork, yet never confirmed it.

The 2 miles tall geoglyph, which has a perimeter of 17 miles , is situated on a plateau at Finnis Springs 60km west Marree in South Australia, portrays an Indigenous man wielding a boomerang or throwing stick used for hunting.

The artwork was reportedly discovered on June 26 1998 by a Central Air Services pilot. But the site was closed by the SA Government one month later after Native Title claimants took legal action.

In 2012 the case was settled, but the figure faded overtime due to natural causes.

While it is the second largest geoglyph recorded, its origin remains a mystery. An anonymous press release was sent to media outlets via fax by those believed to have created the figure. They named it 'Stuart's Giant' after the outback explorer John McDouall Stuart.

A plaque with an American flag and Olympic rings was found 16 feet south of the figure's nose, believed to be buried by the original creators.


Marree Man Theories

Rumours were quick to spread around the tiny town of Marree. Some suggested that the creation of the geoglyph was a stunt pulled by a local scenic flight operator, who served to profit from the tourism generated by its discovery. Indeed, local charter planes found themselves working overtime to meet the demand for joy rides to see the spectacular figure on the ground below.

Other theories began circulating that Marree Man was the work of extraterrestrials or a warning to politician Pauline Hanson regarding racist comments made about Australian Aborigines.

A more plausible theory is that it was crafted by Bardius Goldberg, an Australian artist, who had expressed interest in creating a work visible from space. When questioned about it, he would neither confirm nor deny that he had created the Marree Man. Goldberg passed away before this theory could be fully investigated.

The giant geoglyph of the Marree Man was quick to become an icon of the small South Australian township and a popular tourist destination, but the famous carving can now barely be seen. While the site has never been accessible to the general public as it falls on Native title lands, the geoglyph is slowly fading through natural erosion. It is only a matter of time before the famous figure disappears forever, taking the secrets of its creation along with it.

April Holloway is an editor and writer with Ancient-Origins. She completed a Bachelor of Science degree and currently works as a researcher.

Visit the Epoch Times Beyond Science page on Facebook, and subscribe to the Beyond Science newsletter to continue exploring the new frontiers of science!


The mystery of the Marree man

ON A REMOTE and empty desert plateau, on the banks of Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre, South Australia, is the world’s second-largest geoglyph. Unlike the 1000-year-old Nazca Lines in Peru that hold the title of the biggest geoglyph, the artwork that became known as the Marree Man is of more recent origin. Located 60km north-west of the tiny town of Marree, it was first spotted from the air by a local pilot in 1998. Investigations were immediately launched into the work, which is 4.2km long and shows a man hunting with a stick.

Local pub-owner Phil Turner bought the Marree Hotel seven years ago partly on the strength of the Marree Man. “I got carried away, like everyone else, with the myth, the mystery and the intrigue, the fact they couldn’t find the people who did it,” he says. “The Marree Man was such an attraction – scenic flights were helping business – and it was part of our decision to buy the pub.”

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Theories about who created it sprouted and grew in all different directions. Investigations centred for a while around the US Army, thanks to the Man’s proximity to the joint US-Australian defence projects of the Woomera Prohibited Area, and the sending of press releases purporting to be written by its creator that included US terminology. In 1999 a plaque was discovered near the Man’s head showing a US flag, and another flag was found in a nearby pit, although it’s been suggested both were red herrings. Inevitably, someone also proposed a theory that it was the work of aliens.

Another possibility is that it was created by SA artist Bardius Goldberg, reported by the Adelaide Advertiser to have told friends he’d been commissioned – and paid $10,000 – to create an artwork visible from space. However, Goldberg died in 2002, and with him the possibility of discovering the truth of that theory.

Phil Turner has his own idea. “In 1998 that land was being fiercely contested for native title claims by a number of Aboriginal groups,” he says. (The Marree Man is located on land held under native title since 2012 by the Arabana Aboriginal Corporation.) “The hair and the headband on the Marree Man, that was not an Arabana practice. That was more associated with someone from the Musgrave Ranges. So why would there be an image of someone from the Musgrave Ranges in Arabana territory? ‘This is my land and I’m going to claim it.’” He thinks the actual execution of the figure, which would have been enormously difficult before the widespread availability of GPS, could only have been done by those with the rare, expensive equipment, knowledge and skills required – he guesses a mining corporation, or even the Department of Defence.

When pressed about the Marree Man’s origins, Phil says, “Do we really want to know who did it? It’s full of myth, mystery, intrigue. It’s important as art, and as one of Australia’s greatest whodunnit stories.”

Whoever put it there, Marree Man attracted sorely needed tourists to the town, whose only other drawcard was the occasional flooding of Kati Thanda–Lake Eyre. So when natural erosion began fading the work, locals were concerned.

Phil knew the figure needed to be preserved. “When you’re at the coalface and you get visitors not just from Australia but from all over the world wanting to see the Marree Man and it’s slowly being eroded, it seemed to me we shouldn’t let this resource fade away,” he says.

He received initial support from the SA government, but soon, “I just kept running into brick walls,” he explains. “They did a costing on it for restoration at about $368,000.” So in 2016, he formed a group to take matters into their own hands. They secured permission from the Arabana Aboriginal Corporation and hired a grader operator to redraw the figure’s 80m-wide lines around the whole of its 24km outline. Their DIY approach cost just $6400. “So I figure we saved the taxpayer a lot of money.”

The restoration was a huge task, says Phil. “We had wonderful help from a surveyor who crunched all the data he could find on the internet and through his professional contacts. But the best he could get, using all the spatial data and resources available to him, was an accuracy of about 10–12m.” But then Phil was anonymously emailed an intricately detailed line drawing of the Marree Man. “Seems like Marree Man is full of miraculous things,” he ponders. Astonishingly, when the team checked the drawing against what remained of the original figure, it was accurate to within 150mm of the original. So they used the mysterious drawing to retrace the Man.

Not only that, but they also improved it, putting in windrows so the lines will catch the rain and promote plant regrowth. “We’ll hopefully end up with a green Marree Man in years to come,” says Phil.

The restoration only increased Phil’s admiration for the original artist. “It’s an amazing feat. The plateau itself isn’t sensitive to the Aboriginal people, they never went up there. Whoever did it knew that. And it’s perfectly positioned on the plateau. The Marree Man is left-handed – why? My surveyor found an image in a book that’s identical to the Marree Man [and was probably used as the model], but he’s right-handed. But if Marree Man was right-handed, he wouldn’t have fitted on the plateau. So they just reversed the image.” In all, he believes, “It’s quite a staggering work of art and needs to be immortalised as such.”

The government didn’t agree. The Department of Environment launched a nearly two-year-long investigation into Phil’s guerrilla public art restoration that involved seizing his computer and all his documents on the Marree Man. He could have received a fine of $100,000 for destroying native grasses.

“I was shocked, mortified,” he says. “I believe I did everything right. We did it with the full approval of the Arabana Aboriginal Corporation. We used an environmentally certified grader, and we believe we did the restoration not only true to the original creator but also in a manner that promoted revegetation.”

The investigation was closed in April with the change of government, and Phil can relax at last. “It cost me $50,000 in legal fees. Am I a happy chappy about that? No, I’m not, but if you ask me if I’d do it again – yes, I would. It was the right thing to do.”

Having done it, he’s ensured the Marree Man can come of age in peace, a sleeping giant bringing life to the desert.


Magnetic Hill, Pink Lake, & Mysterious Geoglyph In Weird & Wonderful Australia [Videos]

Everyone knows about kangaroos, koala bears, and the Sydney Opera House in Australia. But there is so much more to see in this vast continent country, and some of it is pretty darn weird indeed.

In the outback of rural South Australia, close to Pekina and Peterborough, is a strange and wonderful topographic optical illusion. Magnetic Hill is one of several similar spots in the world, and when you stop on the hill, place your car in neutral and release the handbrake, strange things appear to happen.

There's a hill in Australia that's magnetic so if you park your car at the bottom and take the break off it will be pulled to the top #crazy

— Nick Czubin (@NickCzubin) August 8, 2014

Instead of rolling downhill backwards as you would expect your car to do, it will appear to start rolling uphill instead, and that's where the optical illusion side of things comes in.

Atlas Obscura explains that Magnetic Hill is what is known as a "gravity hill," where the layout of the land makes what is actually a downhill slope appear to be going uphill. Some have credited gravity hills as being "magnetic" or that supernatural forces are at work, however, it's merely the unusual lay of the land. Atlas Obscura suggest the experience is best tried with a carload of mystified kids.

The sign at Magnetic Hill (included top of article) is rather amusing and claims that plastic and aluminium cars will roll downhill, but steel-made vehicles will roll up. They warn recipients of hip and knee replacements to just "hold on."

There's also a giant magnet sign on the side of the road to mark the spot.

Now we take a trip to Lake Hillier, a saline lake at the edge of Middle Island in the Recherche Archipelago, just off the southern coast of Western Australia.

Measuring around 2,000 feet in length and around 820 feet wide, the lake is surrounded by a narrow strip of sand. But what makes this lake so unusual is that it is colored a bright and lurid pink.

Unlike other colored lakes, the pink color is permanent and will be retained even when water is taken from the lake and placed in a glass jar.

No one knows for sure why Lake Hillier has this bright pink hue, but according to a blog by Spaceships Campervan Hire in Australia, this is caused by a micro-algae called Halobacteria. This micro-algae apparently produces carotenoids in the water, lending Lake Hillier that amazing pink hue. This colorful natural phenomenon is best viewed from the air but it is, apparently, quite safe to swim in the pink water.

The guy from SciShow gives his amusing opinions about the colorful body of water in the video below.

Last, but by no means least, we have a mysterious geoglyph that magically appeared in a barren region of South Australia. Most people have heard of crop circles, which are one type of geoglyph, and others have heard of the famous and ancient Nazca Lines in Peru. However, this far more recently made geoglyph in Australia also has totally unknown and mysterious origins.

No one has a clue who made it, whether it was aliens, a visiting artist, or just a bored local, but back in 1998, someone, or several someones, managed to create a line drawing of an aboriginal hunter, throwing stick or boomerang in hand, measuring 2.6 miles in length.

It is the largest geoglyph in the world and can even be spotted from space as shown in the satellite image here.

The lines themselves measure 115 feet in width and are one foot in depth and the work of art has been dubbed "Marree Man" by the locals.

Marree Man was found by chance in 1998 by a pilot flying over the area who quite simply could not believe his eyes, as he had often flown over the area before.

All kinds of theories have been thrown around about the origins of the geoglyph, and in 1999, an anonymous fax message advised of a plaque which is located close to the Marree Man's head.

The plaque shows an image of an American flag, a quote from a book about aboriginal hunting, and the Olympic rings, but this didn't particularly help in identifying the artist, unless it was an Olympic runner from America who has studied the hunting art of the Aboriginals.

Keeping with the American theme, Atlas Obscura mentions that a further discovery was made in a pit close to the site. This included a jar containing yet another American flag along with a satellite photo of the Marree Man and a strange reference to the Branch Davidian religious sect.

Despite all this evidence pointing to the USA, some locals have, however, proposed that an Australian artist who died in 2002 may have been the culprit. Whoever did it, it is a fascinating site indeed, and while you cannot access the geoglyph on foot, flyovers are permitted and aerial tours are on offer to experience it first hand from the air.

These three examples are just some of the weird and wonderful locations to visit in Australia, making it a fascinating destination of note.

[Photos: Magnetic Hill sign CC BY 2.0 Simon Yeo / Magnet sign in the Public Domain by Roo72 / Marree Man satellite image in the Public Domain by Diceman / Aerial photo: CC BY-SA 3.0 Peter Campbell]


What happened to the Marree Man? Mysterious South Australia geoglyph wiped off map

HE APPEARED out of nowhere in a barren corner of Australia. Two decades on, the mystery of the Marree Man still baffles.

An aerial photo of the famed spiral-tailed monkey seen like it is losing its tail in Nazca, Peru. Part of the mysterious Nazca Lines. Picture: AP Photo/Peruvian Air Force Source:AP

IT’S as enthralling as any ancient legend, but the mystery of South Australia’s Marree Man is far more modern and in danger of being far shorter lived than folk figures before it.

From the red dirt ground, it’s a series of dug out lines wider than city roads apparently carved with some serious excavation equipment.

The lines and swirls look to be the product of an impressive operation, but its not until you get up in the air that spectators can really marvel at the mythical giant man.

From the air, those lines made with a plough or ripper form the figure of Marree Man. The 4km tall carving, 28km in total length, clearly makes up the shape of an indigenous man, most likely a hunter armed with a throwing stick.

At least that was the case in 1998 when a tourism operator was reportedly the first to catch a glimpse of the enormous artwork. Since then, natural forces have caused the once 35cm deep carved outline to erode and the figure to fade.

Though locals have been campaigning for the Marree Man to be preserved, these days he’s just about gone with only a few barely distinguishable features remaining.

“Very little of it remains and it’s just devastating,” Phil Turner, a local publican and vocal campaigner for the preservation of Marree Man, tells news.com.au.

“There are so many aspects about it which are just mind boggling. The size, its shape, where it’s located, how it was done. On top of those things it was just an absolute herculean task, a major effort and it produced an extraordinary work of art.

“The most incredible thing is, we don’t know who did it.”

Marree Hotel Publican Phil Turner pictured out front of his pub wants the eroding Marree Man restored. Picture: Tricia Watkinson. Source:News Limited

The Marree Man was first spotted, according to his own claims, by tour flight operator Trevor Wright.

Mr Wright noticed the outline from the air back in 1998 and reported back to the town, which was soon in the grip of a Chinese whispers epidemic.

Everyone from the US Army to local artists was said to have had a hand in creating the figure.

Mr Turner recalls first reading about the Marree Man those 17 years ago in an article which included a more than half-formed argument for alien involvement.

“You can understand because of its sheer size, and no one could really explain it,” he says.

𠇊round the same time all these (crop) circles were appearing in England and Scotland, I guess you could say the world was UFO happy. I was enthralled.”

The alien theory has never really stood up but others have circulated widely.

Mr Turner said not a week goes by when a pub patron doesn’t claim to know exactly how it got there.

Just last week, he says, a returning local claimed to have witnessed a fleet of Australian Army vehicles with trawling equipment heading towards the Marree plateau.

History shows the army was in town for a training exercise but no involvement with the artwork has been proven.

Another theory says it was a parting gift from the US Air Force after their time at the Joint Defense Facility Nurrungar they shared with the Australian Defence Force at Woomera from 1969 to the late 1990s.

The only solid lead was taken to the grave by contemporary South Australian artist Bardius Goldberg.

SA artist Bardius Goldberg believed to be responsible for creating Marree Man. Source:News Limited

The eccentric artist was reported to have wanted to create a sculpture that could be seen from space.

The Adelaide Advertiser reported he had told friends he𠆝 been paid $10,000 to create the plan for the giant man and shown early grafts of the sand sculpture.

“That’s all there is for sure. There’s no two ways that Goldberg was involved, but unfortunately he passed away in 2002,” Mr Turner says.

𠇊 lot of people have been involved, said they’ve been involved, but whatever happened here we are all these years later and now people are saying 𠆍o we really want to know who did it?’ because that’s the mystery.”

Along with the mystery of who created Marree Man is the question of why.

Of course, there’s not a solid answer to this either but it’s certainly served its purpose over the years.

It&aposs widely recognised as the second largest geoglyph — a large design produced on ground — in the world.

Before it started fading, it was a star attraction of charter flight tours around the region.

The region’s native title owners, the Arabana people, took ownership of the man with the Arabana Aboriginal Corporation trademarking the term “Marree Man” for use on souvenirs, though the trademark was given up earlier this year the Advertiser reports.

Though local tourism authorities have been unenthusiastic about the figure, local operators believe it could serve as a strong sustainable attraction to the outback area.

Mr Turner says everyone who comes to his pub asks, “where’s the Marree Man?”.

“The far north desert regions of SA lack a long term sustainable outback attraction,” he says.

“The NT’s got Uluru, there’s Kakadu, the Kimberly, even the Great Barrier Reef is considered and outback attraction in Queensland. South Australia doesn’t have anything, other than when there’s water in Lake Eyre every 10 years and everyone flocks to see the fish and birds, but there’s nothing long term and sustainable and I believe the Marree Man could be that.”

An image from NASA showing Marree Man from space. Picture: Australian Centre for Remote Sensing Source:News Limited

WHO SHOULD TAKE CARE OF IT?

The main reason the giant figure hasn’t been preserved is because nobody’s stuck up their hand to take care of it.

Aaron Stuart, the chairman of the Prescribed Body Corporation of Arabana Native Title, who said Marree Man would be known as Arabana Man in keeping with the local people’s wishes, told the Advertiser it wasn’t really a priority.

“There are more important cultural artworks right next to Arabana Man that you cannot see from a plane . rock carvings that are 40,000 years old,’’ Mr Stuart said.

“So, to me, it doesn’t bother me if Arabana man isn’t restored. There are people who are looking to it from a financial benefit point of view, but Aboriginal people are not going to be treated like third class citizens and not get something out of their land while others benefit.”

Aerial view in 2001. Source:News Limited

Aerial view of fading giant mystery drawing Marree Man in 2002. Source:News Limited

Representatives from the Art Gallery of South Australia and the Tourism Ministry said they had had no approaches from members of the community to take responsibility for the artwork.

And the biggest cheerleader for Arabana or Marree Man’s preservation doesn’t even know how he𠆝 like it handled.

“I don’t think it’s anyone’s responsibility, it’s got to be initiated by people like ourselves who appreciate it,” Mr Turner says.

“I’m not proportioning blame, I think it’s just the natural process of what happens. Unless some authority decides hey this is important, and I believe that authority should be maybe the national gallery, SA museum, whatever, only from the perspective that it should be protected as a state asset.”

The Man’s enthusiasts say restoring it wouldn’t be a particularly difficult job, but it would need considerable maintenance.

“It’s going to require very sophisticated surveying and station plotting and reverencing back with satellite photos from when it first appeared, but it’s no different to restoring a find work of art,” Mr Turner says.

“You may only have one small corner of the Rembrandt left but after years with a lot of professional work you can restore it.”

An aerial photo of the famed spiral-tailed monkey seen like it is losing its tail in Nazca, Peru. Part of the mysterious Nazca Lines. Picture: AP Photo/Peruvian Air Force Source:AP

As in size, South Australia’s famous geoglyph is only eclipsed in mystery by the Peruvian Nazca Lines.

Recognised as the world’s largest geoglyphs, the series of figures which can only be seen from the air are believed to have been created to be seen by the Nazca people’s gods.

Some say the figures, ranging from detailed animals to apparently random lines and more intricate designs, are made to represent constellations, while other theorised some of them represented the flow of water.

The lines were first spotted from the air in 1939 and in 1994 were recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

But World Heritage status or not, to some, the Marree or Arabana Man will always be that little bit more special.

“I get goosebumps when I stand there and I look and think how the hell did they do that? Standing alongside it is a pretty humbling experience, but to see it from the air is amazing.”


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The day a giant was discovered

The charter pilot Trac Smith is used to the sight of the endless width of the South Australian Outback. Almost every day he flies over the auburn desert landscape. There is nothing here. The weather is too extreme and the distance to larger towns to big, which is why the region is practically deserted. Only very few animals and plants survive here.

Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre (Lake Eyre), when it is full of water, is the biggest lake in Australia and at .

But when Smith flies over a spot near Lake Eyre on June 26, 1998, he is amazed. Drawn in the ground below, there is a gigantic figure of a man holding up his arm to throw a spear. At an altitude of over 1000 meters, Smith sees the drawing very clearly. But how did it get there?


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Follow The Sun

Services

©News Group Newspapers Limited in England No. 679215 Registered office: 1 London Bridge Street, London, SE1 9GF. "The Sun", "Sun", "Sun Online" are registered trademarks or trade names of News Group Newspapers Limited. This service is provided on News Group Newspapers' Limited's Standard Terms and Conditions in accordance with our Privacy & Cookie Policy. To inquire about a licence to reproduce material, visit our Syndication site. View our online Press Pack. For other inquiries, Contact Us. To see all content on The Sun, please use the Site Map. The Sun website is regulated by the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO)


Watch the video: What Is Hiding Under The World Famous Nazca Lines In Peru. Blowing Up History (August 2022).