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Remora SS-487 - History

Remora SS-487 - History



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Remora

(SS-487: dp. 1,570 (surf.), 2,414 (subm.); 1. 311'8"; b. 27'3";dr. 16'5'; s. 20 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.); cpl. 76; a. 1 5",10 21" tt.; cl. Tench)

Remora (SS - 87) was laid down on 5 March 1945 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H.; launched on 12 July 1945, sponsored by Mrs. T. W. Samuels, III, and commissioned on 3 January 1946, Comdr. Robert Sellars in command.

Completing her Caribbean shakedown in April 1946, Remora operated out of New London, Conn., as a training submarine until January of 1947. Then transferred to the Pacific, she transited the Panama Canal at midmonth and arrived at Mare Island, Vallejo, Calif., on 14 February to begin a GUPPY II conversion. Early in November, she completed trials and on the 22d arrived at San Diego, her new homeport.

For the next 2 years, she remained in the eastern Pacific, operating primarily off California, but during the summer and early fall of 1948, ranged as far north as the Aleutians. On 1 May 1950 she headed west for her first deployment in the Far East. On 8 June she arrived at Sasebo; and on the 11th she shifted to Yokosuka, from which base she conducted ASW training exercises with units of Naval Forees Far East. Two weeks later the Korean war began.

A unit of TF 96, Naval Forees JaDan Remora patrolled Soya Strait, between Hokkaido and Sakhaiin in late July and early August. Later in the month, she headed back to San Diego. During the next 2 years she underwent overhaul, provided services for the Line School at Monterey, and conducted local training exercises. She returned to the western Pacific in early 1953. Arriving at Buckner Bay on 15 March, she continued on to Japan in April and at midmonth rejoined TF 96. In June she was back in Okinawan waters for patrols and exereises, after which she returned to Yokosuka. On 2 July she headed east, reaching San Diego on 3 August.

After the fighting in Korea ended, Remora remained based at San Diego and through the decade continued to alternate training exercises and patrols in the western Pacific with similar 1st Fleet operations off the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. She remained in the eastern Pacific during 1956 and 1958, but, during the spring of the latter year, was engaged in extended exercises off Alaska.

In November 1961, Remora was transferred from San Diego to Pearl Harbor. The following year she underwent a 7-month GUPPY III conversion which lengthened her hull by 15 feet and her conning tower by 5 feet. Then, in 1963, she was employed to evaluate antisubmarine sonar in Hawaiian waters. In May of 1964, she resumed a schedule of annual 6-month WestPac deployments which she continued into 1969. In August 1969, Remora shifted home ports, from Pearl Harbor to Charleston, S.C. With the execption of one Mediterranean cruise, from 16 February to 26 June 1970, she continued to operate out of Charleston, along the Atlantic seaboard, in the Caribbean, and in the Gulf of Mexico, until decommissioned 29 October 1973 at Charleston. On that date she was transferred to the Heilenie Navy and recommissioned as Katsonis (S-115).


Remora SS-487 - History

A fish with a suctorial disk on its head enabling it to cling to other fish and to ships.

(SS-487: dp. 1,570 (surf.), 2,414 (subm.) l. 311'8" b. 27'3"

dr. 16'5" s. 20 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.) cpl. 76 a. 1 5",

Remora (SS-487) was laid down on 5 March 1945 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H. launched on 12 July 1945 sponsored by Mrs. T. W. Samuels, III and commissioned on 3 January 1946, Comdr. Robert Sellars in command.

Completing her Caribbean shakedown in April 1946, Remora operated out of New London, Conn., as a training submarine until January of 1947. Then transferred to the Pacific, she transited the Panama Canal at midmonth and arrived at Mare Island, Vallejo, Calif., on 14 February to begin a GUPPY II conversion. Early in November, she completed trials and on the 22d arrived at San Diego, her new homeport.

For the next 2 years, she remained in the eastern Pacific operating primarily off California, but during the summer and early fall of 1948, ranged as far north as the Aleutians. On 1 May 1950 she headed west for her first deployment in the Far East. On 8 June she arrived at Sasebo, and on the 11th she shifted to Yokosuka, from which base she conducted ASW training exercises with units of Naval Forces Far East. Two weeks later the Korean war began.

A unit of TF 96, Naval Forces Japan Remora patrolled Soya Strait, between Hokkaido and Sakhahn in late July and early August. Later in the month, she headed back to San Diego. During the next 2 years she underwent overhaul, provided services for the Line School at Monterey, and conducted local training exercises. She returned to the western Pacific in early 1953. Arriving at Buckner Bay on 15 March, she continued on to Japan in April and at midmonth rejoined TF 96. In June she was back in Okinawan waters for patrols and exercises, after which she returned to Yokosuka. On 2 July she headed east, reaching San Diego on 3 August.

After the fighting in Korea ended, Remora remained based at San Diego and through the decade continued to alternate training exercises and patrols in the western Pacific with similar 1st Fleet operations off the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. She remained in the eastern Pacific during 1956 and 1958, but, during the spring of the latter year, was engaged in extended exercises off Alaska.


2004 Florida Code TITLE XXXII REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS Chapter 487 PESTICIDE REGULATION AND SAFETY PART I FLORIDA PESTICIDE LAW (ss. 487.011-487.175) 487.046 Application licensure.

(1) Application for license shall be made in writing to the department on a form furnished by the department. Each application shall contain information regarding the applicant's qualifications, proposed operations, and license classification or subclassifications, as prescribed by rule.

(2) If the department finds the applicant qualified in the classification for which the applicant has applied, and if the applicant applying for a license to engage in aerial application of pesticides has met all of the requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of Transportation of this state to operate the equipment described in the application and has shown proof of liability insurance or posted a surety bond in an amount to be set forth by rule of the department, the department shall issue a certified applicator's license, limited to the classifications for which the applicant is qualified. The license shall expire as required by rules promulgated under this part, unless it has been revoked or suspended by the department prior to expiration, for cause as provided in this part. The license or authorization card issued by the department verifying licensure shall be kept on the person of the licensee while performing work as a licensed applicator.

History. --ss. 12, 37, ch. 92-115 s. 10, ch. 94-233 s. 16, ch. 2000-154 s. 82, ch. 2004-5 s. 29, ch. 2004-64.

Disclaimer: These codes may not be the most recent version. Florida may have more current or accurate information. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or the information linked to on the state site. Please check official sources.

Subscribe to Justia's Free Newsletters featuring summaries of federal and state court opinions .


1997 Florida Code TITLE XXIX PUBLIC HEALTH Chapter 400 Nursing Homes And Related Health Care Facilities PART IV HOME HEALTH AGENCIES (ss. 400.461-400.518) 400.487 Patient assessment establishment and review of plan of care provision of services.

(1) The home health agency providing care and treatment must make an assessment of the patient's needs within 48 hours after the start of services.

(2) The attending physician for a patient receiving care or treatment provided by a licensed nurse or by a physical, occupational, or speech therapist must establish a plan of care for the patient on behalf of the home health agency that provides services to the patient. The original plan of treatment must be signed by the physician and reviewed, at least every 62 days or more frequently if the patient's illness requires, by the physician in consultation with home health agency personnel that provide services to the patient.

(3) Each patient has the right to be informed of and to participate in the planning of his or her care. Each patient must be provided, upon request, a copy of the plan of care established and maintained for that patient by the home health agency.

(4) Home health services that are provided to a patient must be evaluated in the patient's home by a physician licensed under chapter 458, chapter 459, chapter 460, or chapter 461 or by a registered nurse licensed under chapter 464 as frequently as necessary to assure safe and adequate care, but not less frequently than once every 62 days.

(5) A home health agency must provide at least one home health service to patients for whom it has agreed to provide care. Services provided by others under contractual arrangements to a home health agency's patients must be monitored and controlled by the home health agency.

(6) The services provided by a home health agency, directly or under contract, must be supervised and coordinated in accordance with the plan of care.

History.--s. 46, ch. 75-233 s. 2, ch. 81-318 ss. 79, 83, ch. 83-181 s. 4, ch. 88-219 s. 1, ch. 90-61 ss. 9, 23, ch. 93-214 s. 783, ch. 95-148 s. 3, ch. 96-222.

Disclaimer: These codes may not be the most recent version. Florida may have more current or accurate information. We make no warranties or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this site or the information linked to on the state site. Please check official sources.

Subscribe to Justia's Free Newsletters featuring summaries of federal and state court opinions .


Remora SS-487 - History


(SS-391: dp. 1,525 (surf.), 2,391 (subm.) 1. 312' b. 27' dr. 15'3" s. 20 k. (surf.), 9 k. (subm.) cpl. 66 a. 1 5",

Pomfret (SS-391) was laid down 14 July 1943 and launched 27 October 1943 by the U.S. Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H. sponsored by Miss Marilyn Maloney, daughter of Senator Francis Maloney and commissioned 19 February 1944, Comdr. Frank C. Acker in command.

After training, the new submarine arrived Pearl Harbor 1 June 1944. 8he departed Pearl Harbor 23 June and proceeded via Midway to her first patrol area&mdashEast Kyushu and Bungo Suido. On 6 July she made an emergency dive when attacked by a Japanese plane. On 12 July she allowed a Japanese hospital ship to proceed in peace. After attempting an attack on a battleship, she arrived at Midway 16 August.

On 10 September she departed Midway for the Luzon Straits, South China Sea area to conduct her second patrol. She sighted two enemy battleships on the 26th, but their speed and the presence of an enemy submarine prevented an attack.

On 2 October Pomiret sank Tsugama Maru, a 6,962-ton passenger-cargo vessel. After the usual depth charging, she departed for Saipan and moored in Tanapag Harbor 12 October.

After refit and training, Pomfret reentered the same patrol area 1 November as part of a wolf pack. Pomfret sank Atlm Maru, 7,347-tons and Hamburg Maru, 5,271-tons. On the 25th, she sank the Japanese cargo ship Shoho Maru, 1,356tons. Pomfret departed the area and proceeded via Midway to Pearl Harbor.

The ship began her fourth patrol 25 January 1945 in another wolf pack. The mission was a picket boat sweep ahead of a carrier task force soon to strike the Tokyo Nagoya area. After completing the sweep without encountering any picket boats, she moved south of Honshu for lifeguard work.

On 16 February she rescued a pilot from Hornet. The next day, she saved a pilot from Cabot. That day she also captured two prisoners. Unsuccessfully attacked by a Japanese destroyer on 10 March, she departed the area 23 March and arrived at Midway on the 30th.

Departing Midway 26 April for the Kurile Islands, Okhotsk Sea area, she entered the area 5 May. On the 26th she fired torpedoes at an enemy anti submarine hunter-killer group, but scored no hits. She returned to Midway 7 June.

On 2 July she departed for her sixth war Datrol. After lifeguard duty south of Honshu, she began patro) in the East China Sea. On the 19th she sank the first of 44 floating mines. On the 24th, she shelled the Kuskski Jima lighthouse and radio installations and, on the 26th, she destroyed a threemasted junk and a small schooner. On 8 August she rescued the entire five-man crew of a B-25 bomber. Pomfret continued to shell small craft and piek up Japanese and Korean survivors until the cessation of hostilities 15 August 1945. The following day she headed for Guam. On 9 September she arrived at San Francisco.

On 2 January 1946 Pomfret departed Mare Island for Guam, arriving 22 January 1947. She proceeded to Subic Bay, Philippine Islands 9 March, and from there steamed to Tsingtao, China where for six weeks she acted as target for U.S. antisubmarine warfare vessels based at Tsingtao. On 18 May she returned to Pearl Harbor, her new homeport. During the next three years, she made two tours of duty in WestPac: the first, April to August 1947, and the second, December 1948 to April 1949.

In 1950 Pomfret arrived in San Diego. She operated along the coast until February 1951 when she participated in the Korean action until September, when she returned to San Diego to operate locally. Pomfret decommissioned in April 1952 for conversion at Mare Island Naval Shipyard to a Guppy IIA submarine. After conversion, she recommissioned 5 December and in the ensuing years alternated between eeastal operations out of San Diego and WestPac deployments.

She departed for Far Eastern waters 7 July 1967 on a cruise which included anti-submarine warfare exercises in the Gulf of Tonkin off Viet Nam. She returned to San Diego 23 January 1968 and spent most of that year in exercises off of San Diego.


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NAVY USS REMORA SS-487 SUBMARINE FORCE CHALLENGE COIN

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How Remora Fish Get Their Bizarre Suckers

Scientists say they've confirmed how remora fish grow a weird sucking disc on their heads.

Remoras, which can be up to 3 feet (1 meter) long, have a slatted disc above their eyes, which sort of looks like the bottom of a sneaker. It acts like a sucker and allows them to attach to manta rays, sharks, and boat hulls in tropical waters. But the fish aren't parasites rather, they harmlessly hitch rides and feed off of scraps of food from their hosts.

It had long been suspected that the sucker was made out of the rearranged parts of a normal dorsal fin, but their development hadn't been studied. By watching remoras grow up from their earliest larva stages, a group of scientists says they finally confirmed that the sucker does indeed come from fin parts.

"We followed the earliest stages of the disc's development by matching the first vestiges of elements of the sucking disc with the first vestiges of elements of the dorsal fins of another fish, the white perch (Morone americana), which has the typical dorsal fin of most fishes," researcher Dave Johnson, zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, explained in a statement.

Johnson and colleagues observed that through a series of small changes, three typical fin elements &mdash the distal radials, the proximal-middle radials, and the fin spines &mdash transform during development to form the remora's sucker.

The researchers also found that remora larvae have distinctive hooked teeth protruding from the lower jaw. Johnson says that may be a clue to how the baby fish hitchhike before they grow their suckers.

"Because remora larvae at this stage are relatively rare in plankton collections, I have often wondered, although we don't have any evidence for it, if maybe remora larvae are not free living in the plankton layer but go into the gill cavities of fishes and use their hooked teeth to hang on until they develop a disc," Johnson said in a statement. "Fodder for future research."

The research was detailed in the Journal of Morphology.

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Remora

Also known as shark suckers or suckerfish, remoras are long, thin, dark fishes that are distributed throughout the world in warm seas. Ancient sailors believed remoras had the power to slow or even stop a ship by attaching themselves to it the name remora, which means "delay" in Latin, arose from this ancient superstition. The poor remora’s reputation isn’t much better today. Even though remoras don’t harm their hosts, they are popularly thought of as unwanted guests who get a free ride and a free meal by way of the efforts of others. It is therefore common to see remora used metaphorically in such contexts as "hungry paparazzi who attach themselves like remoras to celebrities."


Sharksucker fish's strange disc explained

Sharksucker fish (genus Remora) with its unusual sucking disc on its head that it uses to attach itself to large marine animals such as sharks. Credit: Dave Johnson

There's an old legend about a fish that attaches itself to ships and has powers to slow them down. The powers may be mythical but the fish is real.

It is a sharksucker, and it has a sucking disc on the top of its flattened head that it uses to attach itself, more usually, to large sea animals. It's thought this unique disc is a modified dorsal fin and now scientists have got the evidence to prove it is.

Fish experts (ichthyologist) Ralf Britz of the Natural History Museum and David Johnson of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, investigated how the sucking disc develops in larval fish from the Remora genus. They took snapshots of the developmental stages, staining the bones red to see changes more clearly.

Development comparisons

To see whether the sucking disc is created from the existing dorsal fin that most other fish have, they looked at how the dorsal fin developed in the same early stages in another fish, of the genus Morone, which has a typical dorsal fin as an adult consisting of spinous and soft dorsal fin parts. They compared the two.

Such comparisons help to establish whether structures in different species have the same evolutionary origin despite looking and functioning differently, for example the arm in a human and the wing in a bat. This is known as homology.

Sharksucker fish on a green turtle. Credit: Terry Dormer/ NHM

Results in small changes

Up to a certain stage in the fishes development, the dorsal fin can be seen developing in the same way and looking very similar in both fishes.

Then, over a series of small changes, the dorsal fin in the Remora begins to expand and shift towards the head.

By the time the Remora has reached around 30mm in length, the dorsal fin has become a fully formed 2mm sucking disc. It still has the components found in the dorsal fin, the tiny fin spines, spine bases and supporting bones, but the spine bases have greatly expanded.

Sharksucker fish with its bones stained red to show early development of dorsal fin (A) - close-up at the bottom. At this stage it looks like a normal dorsal fin that most other fish have - you can see the fin spines. Credit: Ralf Britz

So, the sucking disc is formed by a massive expansion of the dorsal fin through small changes while the fish is developing. It is not the result of the evolution of a completely new structure.

Britz, who last year uncovered the origin of pufferfishes' beaks, says, 'What keeps impressing me when I study the development of some of the weirdest structures in the fish world is that natura non facit saltus, "nature does not make jumps", and even the strangest anatomical modifications happen through small gradual changes in development'.

Comparing equivalent structures (1,2,3) in a normal dorsal fin in a Morone fish (top) and in a dorsal fin that has become a sucking disc in the sharksucher, Remora (bottom) - individual parts have been separated to show detail.

Ralf Britz with a sharksucker in the Museum's tank room.

There are 8 species of sharksuckers and they are the only fish with a sucking disc. Their closest relatives are the cobia and dolphin fish (or Mahi mahi). They are found in tropical and subtropical oceans.

Sharksuckers use the spines and suction of their sucking disc to attach themselves to large marine animals.

They don't seem to cause any harm, or benefit, to the animal they're attached to, and they live off scraps of food, faeces or parasites from the larger animal.

Some people are known to use sharksuckers to catch other fish, throwing them into the sea attached to a fishing line and pulling them in once they are attached to a larger sea animal.

The Remora sucking disc research was published in the Dec 2012 issue of the Journal of Morphology.


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