The story

Joseph E. Campbell DE-70 - History

Joseph E. Campbell DE-70 - History



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Joseph E. Campbell DE-70

Joseph E. Campbell

Joseph Eugene Campbell was born 23 July 1919 in Vigo County, Ind. He enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve 29 March 1941 at St. Louis, Mo. After preliminary flight training at Robertson, Mo., he was transferred to Pensacola for further flight training. Appointed Naval Aviator 17 December 1941, he was commissioned Ensign 21 January 1942. Assigned to Cruiser Scouting Squadron 6 in the Pacific, Ens. Campbell was killed in action while engaging the enemy 9 August 1942.

(DE-70: dp. 1,400; 1. 306'; b. 37'; dr. 9'5"; s. 24 k.; cpl. 186; a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 8 20mm., 2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (h.h.), 3 21" tt.; cl. Buckley)

Joseph E. Campbell (DE-70) was laid down 29 March 1943 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Hingham, Mass.; launched 26 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Marie S. Campbell, mother of Ens. Campbell; and commissioned 23 September 1943, Lt. Comdr. J. F. Bowling, in command.

After shakedown off Bermuda, Joseph E. Campbell departed Boston 11 October; and, after escorting a convoy to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, returned to New York 16 December. Between 31 December 1943 and 8 October 1944 the destroyer escort made three convoy escort voyages to French North Africa.

Returning to New York from the last voyage 8 October, conversion to a high speed transport began and Joseph E. Campbell was reclassified APD-49 on 24 November 1944. After exercises and training along the East Coast, the high speed transport departed Key West 8 March 1945, arriving Pearl Harbor 8 April via the Panama Canal and San Diego. Departing Pearl Harbor the 29th, she steamed to Eniwetok, where she rendezvoused with two merchant ships and escorted them to Leyte. For the next 3 months Joseph E. Campbell served as antisubmarine screen for LST groups in and out of Okinawa. On I September she departed Cebu, P.I., as part of the screen for occupation forces for Japan, where she arrived 8 days later. Joseph E. Campbell continued her escort duties between Japan and the Philippines until returning to the East Coast in December. After visiting Philadelphia and Norfolk she steamed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and San Juan, P.R., where she embarked passengers and returned to Morehead City, N.C., 31 March 1946.

After visits to Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Hampton Roads, Joseph E. Campbell arrived Charleston, S.C., 22 May for inactivation. Secured for preservation, she was towed to Green Cove Springs, Fla., where she decommissioned 15 November 1946, and joined the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Orange, Tex. Campbell was struck from the Navy List 1 December 1966 after being sold to Chile in November 1966.

Joseph E. Campbell received one battle star for World War II service.


Sovereignty Commission Online

Search Options

Basic Name Search

All personal names in records created by the Sovereignty Commission were indexed by MDAH pursuant to American Civil Liberties Union v. Fordice, 969 F.Supp.403 (S.D.Miss.1994).

Please enter the name you wish to search in the fields below or make your selection by browsing through the name index.

Searches may consist of full or partial name forms. For additional instruction and search tips click help.

Browse Name Index Alphabetically

Select a letter of the alphabet or the list of single nicknames and first names.

Browse Folder Index Alphabetically

Select a letter of the alphabet or the list of miscellaneous titles.

Rebuttal Search

Rebuttal material was submitted for inclusion in the Sovereignty Commission records by privacy respondents in accordance with the court's privacy and disclosure provisions. The court did not require rebuttal material to be indexed for personal names.

Please select a rebuttal folder from the list below or locate the desired folder using a Folder Title Search. For additional instruction and search tips click help.

Photograph Search

All photographs containing no court-ordered redaction have been re-scanned and individually described and are displayed with links back to the original scans, associated documents, and folders. For further details see Collection Description.

Browse Photograph Collection

Click here to see thumbnails of the images. Images may take a few minutes to download on slow connections. For additional instructions click help.

Photograph Keyword Search

Enter search term(s) in box provided and click go to activate the search. Successful searches will produce a thumbnail listing of images. Images may take a few minutes to download on slow connections. For additional instruction and search tips click help.

Photograph Geographic Location Search

Select a location from either the state, county or community drop-down lists below. Click Go to activate the search. Successful searches will produce a thumbnail listing of images. Images may take a few minutes to download on slow connections. For additional instructions click help.


Emergence of the church

On April 6, 1830, Smith organized a few dozen believers into a church. From then on, his great project was to gather people into settlements, called “cities of Zion,” where they would find refuge from the calamities of the last days. Male converts were ordained and sent out to make more converts, a missionary program that resulted in tens of thousands of conversions by the end of Smith’s life. Members of the church, known as Saints, gathered first at Independence, Missouri, on the western edge of American settlement. When other settlers found their presence intolerable, the Saints were forced to move to other counties in the state. Meanwhile, Smith moved his family to another gathering place in Kirtland, Ohio, near Cleveland.

None of these communities survived, however, because the faithful were expelled as soon as their increasing numbers threatened to give them political control of the towns in which they settled. Non-Mormons tolerated a handful of “religious fanatics” in their midst but found dominance by them to be unbearable. Smith fled Kirtland for Far West, Missouri, in 1838, but opposition arose once more. In 1838, facing expulsion for a third time, Smith tried to defend the church with arms. In response, local Missourians rose up in wrath, and the governor ordered that the Mormons be driven out of the state or, where that was not possible, exterminated. In November 1838 Smith was imprisoned on charges of robbery, arson, and treason, and he probably would have been executed had he not escaped and fled to Illinois.

The Mormons came together in the nearly abandoned town of Commerce on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River. Renaming the site Nauvoo (a Hebrew word meaning “Beautiful Place”), Smith built his most successful settlement, complete with a temple (finished only after Smith’s death) on a bluff overlooking the town. Attracting converts from Europe as well as the United States, Nauvoo grew to rival Chicago as the largest city in the state.


Joseph E. Campbell DE-70 - History

For a much more extensive description than appears on this brief page, see the works listed in the realism bibliography and the bibliographies on William Dean Howells.

Definitions

Broadly defined as "the faithful representation of reality" or "verisimilitude," realism is a literary technique practiced by many schools of writing. Although strictly speaking, realism is a technique, it also denotes a particular kind of subject matter, especially the representation of middle-class life. A reaction against romanticism, an interest in scientific method, the systematizing of the study of documentary history, and the influence of rational philosophy all affected the rise of realism. According to William Harmon and Hugh Holman, "Where romanticists transcend the immediate to find the ideal, and naturalists plumb the actual or superficial to find the scientific laws that control its actions, realists center their attention to a remarkable degree on the immediate, the here and now, the specific action, and the verifiable consequence" (A Handbook to Literature 428).

Many critics have suggested that there is no clear distinction between realism and its related late nineteenth-century movement, naturalism. As Donald Pizer notes in his introduction to The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London, the term "realism" is difficult to define, in part because it is used differently in European contexts than in American literature. Pizer suggests that "whatever was being produced in fiction during the 1870s and 1880s that was new, interesting, and roughly similar in a number of ways can be designated as realism, and that an equally new, interesting, and roughly similar body of writing produced at the turn of the century can be designated as naturalism" (5). Put rather too simplistically, one rough distinction made by critics is that realism espousing a deterministic philosophy and focusing on the lower classes is considered naturalism.

In American literature, the term "realism" encompasses the period of time from the Civil War to the turn of the century during which William Dean Howells, Rebecca Harding Davis, Henry James, Mark Twain, and others wrote fiction devoted to accurate representation and an exploration of American lives in various contexts. As the United States grew rapidly after the Civil War, the increasing rates of democracy and literacy, the rapid growth in industrialism and urbanization, an expanding population base due to immigration, and a relative rise in middle-class affluence provided a fertile literary environment for readers interested in understanding these rapid shifts in culture. In drawing attention to this connection, Amy Kaplan has called realism a "strategy for imagining and managing the threats of social change" (Social Construction of American Realism ix).

Characteristics

(from Richard Chase, The American Novel and Its Tradition)

Practitioners

W. D. Howells. As editor of the Atlantic Monthly and of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, William Dean Howells promoted writers of realism as well as those writing local color fiction.

Other Views of Realism

"The basic axiom of the realistic view of morality was that there could be no moralizing in the novel [ . . . ] The morality of the realists, then, was built upon what appears a paradox--morality with an abhorrence of moralizing. Their ethical beliefs called, first of all, for a rejection of scheme of moral behavior imposed, from without, upon the characters of fiction and their actions. Yet Howells always claimed for his works a deep moral purpose. What was it? It was based upon three propositions: that life, social life as lived in the world Howells knew, was valuable, and was permeated with morality that its continued health depended upon the use of human reason to overcome the anarchic selfishness of human passions that an objective portrayal of human life, by art, will illustrate the superior value of social, civilized man, of human reason over animal passion and primitive ignorance" (157). Everett Carter, Howells and the Age of Realism (Philadelphia and New York: Lippincott, 1954).

"Realism sets itself at work to consider characters and events which are apparently the most ordinary and uninteresting, in order to extract from these their full value and true meaning. It would apprehend in all particulars the connection between the familiar and the extraordinary, and the seen and unseen of human nature. Beneath the deceptive cloak of outwardly uneventful days, it detects and endeavors to trace the outlines of the spirits that are hidden there tho measure the changes in their growth, to watch the symptoms of moral decay or regeneration, to fathom their histories of passionate or intellectual problems. In short, realism reveals. Where we thought nothing worth of notice, it shows everything to be rife with significance."
-- George Parsons Lathrop, 'The Novel and its Future," Atlantic Monthly 34 (September 1874):313 24.

“Realism is nothing more and nothing less than the truthful treatment of material.” --William Dean Howells, “Editor’s Study,” Harper's New Monthly Magazine (November 1889), p. 966.

"Realism, n. The art of depicting nature as it is seen by toads. The charm suffusing a landscape painted by a mole, or a story written by a measuring-worm." --Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary (1911)

Context and Controversy

In its own time, realism was the subject of controversy debates over the suitability of realism as a mode of representation led to a critical exchange known as the realism war. (Click here for a brief overview.)

The realism of James and Twain was critically acclaimed in the twentieth century. Howellsian realism fell into disfavor, however, as part of early twentieth century rebellion against the "genteel tradition." For an account of these and other issues, see the realism bibliography and essays by Pizer, Michael Anesko, Richard Lehan, and Louis J. Budd, among others, in the Cambridge Guide to Realism and Naturalism.


Thinking Sideways

History is the prediction of the present. Historians explain why things turned out the way they did. Since we already know the outcome, this might seem a simple matter of looking back and connecting the dots. But there is a problem: too many dots. Even the dots have dots. Predicting the present is nearly as hard as predicting the future.

Once, history was a game played with giant billiard balls: wars, revolutions, scientific inventions, the major awards shows. You knocked a combination of these together and you got our world. Then people realized that wars, revolutions, the Grammys, etc., are not explanations at all. They are themselves things that need to be explained. Something made them possible, too. Was it money? Ideas? Genes? Germs? Great men? Deepwater ports?

Histories are categorized according to what the historian has chosen as the basic unit of explanation. There are top-down histories, bottom-up histories, and sideways histories, histories in which causes have an oblique relation to effects. (Rome fell because the wine jars were made of lead—a fun explanation, though somehow unsatisfying.) There is history of the longue durée, which doesn’t help us understand why 2015 is different from 2000 (or, for that matter, from 1900 or 1800). There is species history, which explains even less. Humans invented agriculture: bad news, end of story. And there is “history of the present,” which tries to see today the way historians a hundred years from now will see it—as one more slice of time during which people had no idea how completely wrong they were about everything.

No historian lines up all the dots. Every work of history is a ridiculously selective selection from the universe of possible dots. What the historian is claiming is that these are the particular dots that lead us from there to here, or from time step 1 to time step 1.1. Lots of other stuff happened, the historian will agree. But, if these things hadn’t happened, then life as we know it wouldn’t be, well, as we know it.

This can be an existentially entertaining thought—that, but for some fluky past event, experience would be entirely, or at least interestingly, different. We tend to imagine our own lives that way, a story of lucky breaks, bullets dodged, roads diverged on a snowy evening, and the like. Speculating about sparks that failed to ignite versus sparks that did and contingencies that failed to materialize versus contingencies that did is one of the reasons people like to write history and like to read it. There is even, to appeal to this taste, the subgenre of counterfactual history, in which Napoleon conquers Russia, or the Beatles give “The Ed Sullivan Show” a pass.

There are many ways of agglomerating past events, parcelling up old clicks of the clock and endowing them with collective meaning. There is the concept of the historical period: the Age of Reason, the long eighteenth century (which seems like cheating if you call something a century, you should stick to a hundred years), the Victorian era, the Cold War, the all-purpose and infinitely capacious “modernity.”

There is the concept of the generation, an empirically specious category (as though the human race reproduced itself just once every twenty-five years) that nevertheless captures an element in everyone’s sense of identity. And, of course, there is the decade. For some obviously bogus reason, presumably because we have ten fingers, we find it natural to imagine that life assumes a completely new character every ten years.

Centuries, generations, and decades are terms of convenience. They attach handles to the past, they give titles to books, and, most important, they put a spin on a chunk of time and differentiate it from all the rest. They give history some coherence. But the most enjoyable histories to read (and, probably, to write) are “the x that changed the world” books. These are essentially one-dot explanations. They try to make the course of human events turn on a single phenomenon or a single year. Recent works in the single-phenomenon category include books on bananas, fracking, cod (that’s correct, the fish), the Treaty of Versailles, pepper, the color mauve, and (hmm) the color indigo. (All right, who’s the baddest color?) In the single-year category, we have books on 33, 1492 (huh?), 1816 (long story involving a volcano), 1944, 1945, 1959 (even though, without going to Wikipedia, you probably can’t come up with two important things that happened in 1959), 1968, 1969, and 1989.

Now there is W. Joseph Campbell’s “1995: The Year the Future Began” (California), a worthy, informative, and sporting attempt to convince us that the world we live in was crucially shaped by things that happened in 1995. (Campbell insists that there is a distinction between “the x that changed the world” books and his own “the year the future began” book, although it’s hard to grasp.)

The book is not completely persuasive, but that’s not important. None of the “x that changed the world” books are completely persuasive, for the reason that all dots have dots of their own. Unless you count God, there is no uncaused cause. Even the butterfly that started the hurricane flapped its wings for a reason. Whatever happened in 33 or 1959 or 1995 never would have happened unless certain things had happened in 32, 1958, and 1994. And so on, back into the protozoic slime. All points are turning points.

All points might not be tipping points. But that’s not what these books are arguing. They are seeking to confer before-and-after explanatory power on a single thing, or on what happened on a single date on the calendar. We can doubt the premise. But what the melodramatic titles are really and usefully doing is drawing our attention to something—pepper or 1959—that we might otherwise have ignored. Do melodramatic titles also sell books? So what if they do? We’re in favor of selling books.

Campbell’s book draws our attention to the nineteen-nineties. And he’s right when he points out that the decade is pretty much ignored. Maybe this is because many Americans remember the nineteen-nineties as a tranquil time or maybe it’s because the decade is wedged between two periods that attract a lot of industrial-strength historical notice: the Reagan era and the “age of terror.”

How tranquil were the nineteen-nineties? “Our Long National Nightmare of Peace and Prosperity Is Finally Over” was the headline in the Onion the month George W. Bush took office, January, 2001. His Administration took care of that in a hurry. In fact, though, the nineteen-nineties were not so peaceful. Dozens of wars were under way around the world. It’s just that, especially while Bill Clinton was President, the United States was involved in very few of them.

It was, however, genuinely a time of prosperity. In 1993, the year Clinton became President, median household income in the United States was $48,884. Six years later, it was $56,080, and the federal government ran a $125.6-billion surplus. There was an even bigger surplus in 2000, and ever since 2001 the federal government has been in the red. In 2013, median household income was $51,939, and the budget deficit was $680 billion (which was small by post-Clinton standards).

The stock market began the nineteen-nineties with the Dow at 2,753. At the end of trading in 1999, the Dow was at 11,497. Middle-class Americans tend to feel that life is good when their 401(k)s are robust. But the quality of public life in the nineteen-nineties, as measured by the headlines, was actually somewhat sad and tawdry. Names in the news: Tonya Harding, Rodney King, Ted Kaczynski, Lorena Bobbitt, Amy Fisher, Heidi Fleiss, Susan Smith, Clarence Thomas and his can of Coke. The movie of the decade was “Titanic.” The No. 1 pop star was Mariah Carey. In baseball, it was the steroid era. (In basketball, there was Michael Jordan, so that much was good.)

The nineteen-nineties was Columbine, the Atlanta Olympics backpack bombing, the World Trade Center truck bombing, and the siege in Waco. Elsewhere around the globe, there was a civil war in Somalia, genocide in Rwanda, and ethnic cleansing in the place formerly known as Yugoslavia. Chechnya was at war with Russia, and a civil war began in Sierra Leone that lasted eleven years. The decade ended with the worldwide Y2K hysteria, a nutty cocktail of digital overthink and Luddite millennialism.

“Don’t ask, don’t tell,” the phrase coined to sum up the Clinton Administration’s policy of resolving the issue of gays in the military by resolving to leave the issue unresolved, seems a fitting slogan for the era. It was a period of loose ends, of isolated eruptions, spasmodic violence, and one-off scandals. Nothing went with anything else. This is because there was no context to hold the headlines together. There was no Cold War, no civil-rights movement, no Vietnam or oil embargo or Reagan revolution, no catchy new mode of music or art or fashion to be forever and fondly associated with the times. Clinton was the obvious person to give the decade an imprint, but he turned out to be the protagonist in yet one more set of depressing headlines about behavior that made no sense.

Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky is one of the five things that happened in 1995 that Campbell believes opened the door to the future. The others are the O. J. Simpson trial, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Dayton negotiations that settled the Bosnian war, and the rise and fall of the Internet browser Netscape Navigator.

The list certainly reflects the inchoate spirit of the age. But that is not Campbell’s point. His point is that our contemporary (American) world started with a White House sex scandal the murder trial of a former football star a set of agreements hammered out among foreign heads of state on an Air Force base in Ohio a loner who thought that blowing up a federal office building was justified on political principles and a computer program that ultimately lost the “browser wars” to Microsoft. You have to admire a historian who proposes to extract reverse-prediction gold from that material.

Campbell’s specialty—he teaches in the School of Communication at American University—is the history of journalism. He is the author of the indispensable “Getting It Wrong: Ten of the Greatest Misreported Stories in American Journalism,” a debunking of exaggerated or fallacious stories that were repeated so often they became what he calls “media myths.” These range from William Randolph Hearst’s promise to “furnish the war” with Spain, in 1897, to the Jessica Lynch story, in 2003, and the coverage of Hurricane Katrina. So “1995” is devoted less to the five world-changing events of that year than to the way they were covered, interpreted, and handed down to us.

What was the lasting importance of the O. J. Simpson trial, which began on January 24, 1995, and concluded on October 3rd? Was it the demonstration that a rich defendant can lawyer up and beat a criminal prosecution? That hardly seems news. A lot of people have thought that the importance of the Simpson trial had to do with race. When the verdict was announced, many white Americans were surprised that a jury could acquit a man who had motive, opportunity, and no alibi, and whose blood appeared to be all over the place. Most people consider it highly unusual for their blood to be anywhere outside their bodies. Black Americans tended to be surprised (or not) that white Americans could be surprised that the case of a black defendant might be mishandled by the cops. The trial was therefore taken to expose the insidious role that race plays in the law-enforcement and criminal-justice systems, and the response to the verdict to reveal a deep split between white and black views on the state of racial relations.

Campbell thinks that the significance of the Simpson trial had almost nothing to do with race. He thinks that Simpson was acquitted because, well, he was a rich defendant who lawyered up and beat the rap. Campbell doesn’t put it this way, but if Simpson had been a white sports celebrity he would very likely also have got off—and although some people might have been upset by the outcome, no one would have been astonished. The Simpson verdict was an anomaly because Simpson was an anomaly, a wealthy, unthreatening, well-connected entertainment star who happened to be African-American. In his case, money and fame bought him a huddle of high-priced lawyers, folks who don’t chase just any ambulance.

The day the Simpson verdict was announced—the judge, Lance Ito, had held the verdict overnight, in part to insure that the announcement would receive maximum coverage—was an interesting moment in the history of American race relations. Campbell doesn’t dispute this. What he disputes is that it was a moment of enduring impact. He says that the trial “dented but did not reverse” a trend in public-opinion polls showing that both white and black Americans believed that racial relations were improving. Simpson’s acquittal was a blip, not a turning point.

So what does Campbell think the enduring significance of the Simpson trial was? It established the credibility of DNA evidence. That is not the first thing that jumps to mind. After all, the DNA evidence against Simpson was ripped apart by one of his lawyers, Barry Scheck. How could this have made people more comfortable with the use of DNA evidence in criminal trials? Campbell argues that Scheck never challenged the validity of DNA evidence per se. He only challenged the handling of that evidence by police investigators. The implication of Scheck’s argument—that Simpson’s samples were corrupted—was that properly handled samples would have yielded admissible results. Which is, in fact, what Barry Scheck believes.

This is sideways history. A relatively technical courtroom exchange has unexpected consequences for the criminal-justice system—and only because the defendant happened to be famous and the crime spectacular, which meant that the trial was televised and millions of people watched it. Like a lot of sideways history, the theory is provocative and a little deflating, especially for someone who knows that, no matter how productively he spends the rest of his life, he will never make back the time he spent following the Simpson trial. Such a person would hope that the experience held a grander lesson than this.

Much of “1995” is sideways history, extracting unintended or unexpected long-term consequences from apparently isolated and eccentric events. But Campbell’s discussion of Netscape Navigator and the Internet is an exception. There he makes a tipping-point argument.


Генеалогия и история семьи Hays Hayes

From Chalkley's Augusta County Records: John and Rebecca married before their journey to America, 1737 voyage, and took their oath in new land on June 26, 1740. John came into the country and made an oath, that he transported himself, wife Rebecca, the families young, Jane, Robert, Charles, Andrew, Barbara, Joan and a nephew or grandson, Robert Hays, from Scotland to Philadelphia. He gave his Oath of Loyalty to America. John was given land Grants, in Rockbridge CO. VA. (Recorder in book 2 (1739-1741) It was the first time he gave his rights, for providing, for his family, in order to obtain land CERTIFIED May 1740, in Orange Co. VA. John and Rebecca were a part of the Ulsterman Clan Immigrants from Ireland. John Hays eventually chose a 318-acre plantation which he bought for 5 Shillings, located 2 miles north of Rockbridge Baths, where Hays Creek and Moffetts Creek run together. It had a natural mill site. After 1752, Moffetts Creek was renamed Hays Creek and Hays Creek became Walker Creek, thus the original mill site is located on what today is known as Walker Creek. John Hays built the first mill in Rockbridge Co. in 1739, with the help of his sons, Andrew and Charles, after John’s death, Andrew took over running the Mill and then passed down to his son John. Note: It has been noted that the Augusta County clerk made an error when they recorded John’s Will in February 1750. It didn't make sense that John Hays created his will in December 1750 and his death occurred sometime in February of 1750 however, it was since realized, that the date on the will and the county records are correct. The explanation is found in the fact that Great Britain used the Julian calendar until 1752 and, as a result, the end of that year was March 24, 1750 – I have researched through many Wills, Land Deeds, Military Records and the Hays/Sims family documents, as they are working diligently to document their Genealogy and the connection with the Hays Family. One member went to Virginia, Sept. 2013 and made documents of the true facts found, in the numerous, Will Books, Land Deeds, Court Documents, Marriage and Death Reports and sent me a great deal of much appreciated information. What I have complied and documented, is from a great deal of research and though, there was a fire in the Rockbridge County Court House and many documents were lost after 1890s – I have put together the best documented information and genealogy of the Hays/Hayes family linage, as I was able to prove. C. Hayes Sept.2013 wife of Michael Hayes.

  • The Hermitage House in Tennessee, is very interlinked and documented with the Hays family line because the 7th President of the USA, Andrew Jackson, was a WARD, of John Hays, after he was orphaned (Parents died of Yellow Fever). When Jackson became of age, 21 years old, he lived with Robert Hays’, (and wife Jane Donelson) family, in Tennessee (Robert was John’s son) and grew up with Robert’s children as his own siblings. Jackson had a family connection towards all of the Hays families, due to the Hays family helping him in his youth and later (Nathaniel Hays) selling him the land in which he built his home on – The Hermitage House. Andrew Jackson, made wonderful marriage connections for the Hays family members and also obtained high military potions for the Hays men who became soldiers in hos regiments, he felt compelled to help them as though they were family members this information is documented in Jackson’s writings in the Hermitage House documents and letters written by Andrew Jackson). The names and marriages can be confusing – Three Robert Hays married a Jane and three John Hays, married a Rebecca or Rachel - Very important, to follow land deeds and Wills for true linage and how their lives were interlinked – While living with Col. Robert Hayes and wife Jane Donelson, Jackson met their Granddaughter Rachel and later married her. The other, Robert Hays ( the younger Robert) spoke of and in the family with his wife Jane Collier, were siblings and cousins of (Uncle Col. Robert) Nathaniel, Samuel, William and the parents of Hugh, Charles, Campbell and Thomas. I have noted them with an asterisks and underlining to denote who those mentioned in the Hermitage Museum papers and Jackson’s letters are. The land deeds show proof, the land of the Hermitage House, was first owned by Nathaniel Hays, adjacent to land owned by Hugh, Campbell, Samuel, Robert and William. It is believed their Uncle John Hays and Aunt Rachel Maxwell Hays John1,Andrew2,John3), also lived on Nathaniel’s land for a time and John was called “Hermitage John” for his efforts helping so many find safety (John1,John2), from the Indians and the battles of Virginia. (Hermitage means: Safe Haven, a place of solitude) John and the many brothers and their families, left Virginia and the Indian troubles and the continuing British wars, to Tennessee to find safety and peace. Many of the Hays Family and neighbors were killed on John’s land in Virginia, during a celebration dinner. The Indians brutally massacred and took captive up to 100 people. This lead to the family’s movement, from the colonies and Andrew Jackson’s reason for forming the Trail Of Tears and elimination of all Indians from the colonies. The log cabin is believed to have been built on Nathaniel’s land in Tenn. by John Hays, for he and wife Rachel Maxwell Hays, very sturdy to protect from the Indian raiders. There are many different stories on who first lived in the log cabin, but dates, documents, times and events, point most assuredly to John and Rachel first built the log cabin and lived there. The family massacre, on John’s land, is also one reason, Jack Hays became a Texas Ranger and continued to capture and kill the Indians of War as well as the Mexicans who continued to kill the Colonists and burn their homes. There is a link to President Polk through a Hays daughter’s marriage and to Col. Chitwood, through a marriage. Many family members were soldiers and fought with George Washington in the Battle of Monmouth and he was great friends with many Hays soldiers. Many died during the Indian Wars, Rev. War, Civil War and the many British and Colony Battles. It was a harsh time for the new colonists.

Family Informational Notes from Records in Rockbridge and Wilson Counties:

. Note: Charles Hays — (son of John Hays of VA), is in Davidson County in 1780, and back in Greene County by 1783,

The DASH of OUR LIVES - At a Funeral, a man spoke of his beloved, He referred to the dates on her tombstone, from the beginning to the end, He noted the first date was that of her birth, and spoke of the moment with tears, But he said what mattered most, was the DASH between the years! For that DASH represents all the time, which she spent with us here on earth. And now only those who loved her, Know what that little DASH was worth, For it matters not how much we own the cars, the house, the cash, What matters is how We Live and Love, And how we spend our DASH!

1) Barbara Hays (John1) unknown what happened in Barbara’s Life 2) Robert Hays b. bef. 1750 *Col. Robert Hays - (John) Col. Robert Hays m. Jane Donelson Col. Robert M. Hays A LT. in the North Carolina Infantry in the American Revolutionary War 1776, LT. Robert Hays in N. Carolina Infantry of Amer. Rev He was a brother-in-law to Andrew Jackson –The plantation that Jackson named Hermitage was ideally located 2 miles from The Cumberland and Stone Rivers the land was originally settled by John Hays (John1, John2) and then son Robert. Other brothers and nephews moved into the area and purchased land alongside Robert’s property. Robert was the grandfather to legendary Texas Ranger John Coffee Hays, Campbell Hays and Confederate General Harry Thompson Hays and both grew up in his home in TENN. Jackson and his wife Rachel, moved into an existing two-story log cabin - built to resist Indian attacks. After Jackson built the main house, they moved in. Later there was a fire and during the remodeling, Jackson turned it into the Mansion it is today. The log house was disassembled and rebuilt from a two story to a one-story building used as slave quarters a part of it still stands behind The Hermitage.[4] Initially Jackson operated the cotton farm with nine African slaves, but this number gradually grew to 44 slaves by 1820 as the farm expanded to 1,000 acres. Campbell Hays who served in the Civil War m. Ellen in Carroll CO. AR. Colonel Robert Hays erected the Fort Haysboro in Wilson CO., VA. – just a few miles from Memphis Tenn.

Robert HAYS, who was apparently a very active land broker in a large area encompassing Nashville as Well as "Hays Country" Other HAYS mentioned in the records for the Hermitage Area are Samuel, Hugh, Nathaniel, James and William Hays". Hugh HAYS, Samuel HAYS and Nathaniel HAYS each received grants of 640ac in Davidson County surveyed June 1785, registered 1788 & 1789 (Land Deed Genealogy of Davidson County TN 1783-1792 Vol. I). these grants were adjacent and located between the Cumberland River and Stones Creek. They were within 3 miles west of the present day Wilson/Davidson County, TN lines 1. *Rachel Donelson HAYS m. Stockley had eight children – one was a daughter:

  • * Rachel Stockley - Married Andrew Jackson – President of the US.
  • Robert Hays – married the young couple in his home and later willed the land to Rachel and Andrew.* they married the second time 1794. Adopted a son 1808 - namesake name given -Andrew Jackson, was born son of Severn and Elizabeth Rucker Donelson adopted by The Jacksons – after the Battle of New Orleans Rachel and Andrew took young Jackson with them to Washington 1815, they returned to Tenn. and a dear friend died, John Hutchings, who had a young five year old son, named Andrew Jackson Hutchings, and Rachel and Andrew were named as his Ward (their Charge) and he moved to Hermitage with them. In November 1828, Jackson was elected 7th President of the United States Rachel died after he was elected President but before his inauguration. They had Rachel Jackson a granddaughter born 1832 after Rachel Jackson’s death, and Andrew Jackson III, grandson was born 1834. Andrew Jackson never got over, wife, Rachel’s death – died 1845 and buried beside Rachel on the property of Heritage House.

2) Stockley Donelson HAYS b. 1788 d. 1831 m. Lydia Butler

3) Richard Jackson Hays – named after father’s friend Andrew Jackson - who Nicknamed him Hickory Hays by: AJ

9) Elizabeth HAYS3 (ROBERT2) b. 1805 d. 1841

3) Andrew Hays b1718-1786 (John) HAYS, Andrew, 10 June 1760, 337ac on the branches of James River on the west side of the Blue ridge Patents #34, 1756-62, p.528. m. 1) Prudence Campbell m. 1743 had four children d. 1746 m. 2) Margaret Stephenson1763 – Had four children with each wife. Andrew was possible John’s Eldest son, or the eldest son to stay in Rockbridge CO., VA.

Andrew Hays, Orange Co., VA, Promotion, 1745 made Lieutenant in the militia. John Hays Will - Documented information from the Virginia US Gen Web Archives: Rockbridge County, Virginia. Will book 1 pp 258-260 Andrew Hays Will Northampton CO. then Nashville TN. 1804, died 1808 had 8 children The American Revolutionary War (1775�), the American War of Independence Many of the Hays Men fought the Indian Wars and throughout the Rev. war – The British Colony Freedom Wars with general George Washington and many lives were lost. Andrew’s First Four sons by wife Prudence – Major John, Andrew, Charles and James:

Name[1] Maj. John Hays Gender Male Birth[2] 2 MAR 1746/47 Rockbridge County, Virginia

Alt Birth? 1750 Rockbridge County, Virginia – parentage Andrew and Prudence Hays Marriage򑝷 Nancy Ann Christianson of Virginia

Death? 1808 Nashville, Tennessee

5) Dr. John Brown Hays m. Ophelia Polk sister of

1) Andrew Hays 2) Mary Hays m. Robert Piper 3) Nancy Jane Hays 4) Charles Hays m. Mary Blair in Columbia Adair CO., KY 5) Prudence Hays 6) James Hays m. unknown

1. John Hays 2. Sylvia Hays 3. William Hays 4. Maria Hays 5.žnoch Hays 6.œlayton hays

1. Alexander Hays m. Elizabeth Travis 2. James C, Hays m. Elizabeth Clayton

1. Samuel - fought in the Rev. War and made Lt. by Andrew Jackson - Samuel Hays – son with wife Nancy Margaret - Lt. HAYS, Samuel (wife) Alsey, Old War #11225, served as a private in TN .

M 2. Mary Campbell Walker 1779 had 12 children, see family descendants below – 1810 census records: Charles Hays, militiaman Orange Co., VA, Note: December 18, 1742 – Took part in 1st clash between settler and natives, in what was to be Rockbridge Co., VA., his sons fought in the Rev. War for Independence.

Nameœharles Hays Birth? 24 AUG 1752 Rockbridge County, Virginia – parentage Andrew and Prudence Hays Marriage򑝲šugusta County, Virginia to Martha Gilmore

াT 1779 AND 1780 Death 6 FEB 1812 Nashville to Mary Campbell Walker of Columbia, Adair County, Kentucky

2.M. Mary Truscot: Children: Charles W. Hays, Lewis Hays, Carrie M. Hays , Hattie M. Hays, Emma W. Hays, John W. Hays and Jennie O. Booto – 1. Charles W. Hays m/ Sarah Miller Children: John E. Hays, William E. Hays, Ella C. Hays, Ezra L. Hays, Marsha G. Wiseman, Vera J. Hays, Charles E. Hays, Anna R. Hays, Freddie A. Hays and Leslie M. Hays –

1. Isaac Hays 2. George Campbell Hays �pt. John Lyle of Rockbridge” Chapter III In the first battalion was a militia company under the command of Capt. John Lyle. William McCutchan was the lieutenant and Joseph Long, the ensign. Both had served at Point Pleasant with Lyle. The complete roster of the company has never been found, but it is known that among the men in the ranks were William Miller, Joseph Bell, and William Willson. Miller and Wilson were volunteers, but Bell was drafted. The company assembled at Isaac Campbell’s well known home on the “Great Road.” Campbell had received the property from his father, Gilbert Campbell, by will sixteen years before. The place became the site of the new town of Lexington in 1778. “The Cherokee Expedition,” as the movement became known. See Rockbridge History PDF file

1) David Orestes Hays m. Margaret Hays m.

The American Revolutionary War - Battle of Monmouth -10,000 British troops against 11,000 Americans. 28th June 1778. New Jersey – led by George Washington, who had gone through out the colonies recruiting Young colonists to help fight the British - General Washington marched east from Valley Forge seeking to intercept the slow moving British column of soldiers, which happened at the courthouse. Many lives were lost, many of Charles family.

1) Barbara Hays 1763 m. Guinness 2) David W Hays 1765 m Jane Barnette (d. 1886) (John1, Charles2)

  • *Moses died before September 20, 1796 in Augusta Co. VA. Will of Moses Hays of Augusta Co. VA: Probated 20 Sep 1796. Moses' second marriage to Sophia Wood, Children: Elizabeth Luce, Hannah Halsey, Nancy Hays, James N. Hayes, Mary Stockdale (Stockton), Isaac Hays, Richard Hays, Winsted Hays, William Hayes.** moved to Monroe County, Ohio 1796 Will

1) Samuel Hays 1836-1897m.Susan Billiter Monroe CO. OH. Died in sever dept.

2)šmanda Isabelle Hays m .Joe F. Stine d. 1946 in Monroe County, OH

1) Sarah Hays 184 0m. Cyrus Salisbury 2) Phebee Hays 1844 m. Elias kindle 3)Ÿrancis Hays 1845 m. Sarah Kelley 4) William Thomas Hays 1848 m. Mary Elizabeth Kelley 1867

William Thomas HAYES was born in January 1848 in Monroe County, Ohio. He served in the military in January 1865 in Monroe County, Ohio. From West Virginia Soldiers and Statesmen (Pleasants County): William T. Hayes is of Monroe County, Ohio, where he still lived when he entered the service of his country in January � at the age of 17 he enlisted in Co. G, 184th OVI….information about unit and service……In August � he was married in Washington County, OH to Mary Kelley, of that county, whose father Ebenezer Kelly died in 1861 and whose mother Clara (Woods) Kelly is yet living at age 77. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes had nine children: Clara E. b Jun �, Jane A. March �, Sarah B. b July �, Lillie M. b November �, Delitha F. b February �, Allen T. b May �, Cleveland C. b February � and Phoebe A. b Feb. �. Mr. Hayes’ parents, James & Susannah (Williams) Hayes have both passed away. The former served in the Black Hawk War with the Indians. He had numerous uncles and cousins in the Union service….. (Published 1892] Had 9 Children: 2)œlara E. HAYES was born in June 1869 in Ohio. 3) Jane A. HAYES was born in March 1871 in Ohio. 4) Sarah B. HAYES was born in July 1872. 5) Lillie M. HAYES was born in November 1876. 6) Delilah F. HAYES was born in February 1879 in Monroe County, Ohio. 7)šllen G. HAYES was born in May 1881 Monroe County Ohio.

10) Sarah Hays b. 1842 d. 1924 m Cyrus Salisbury OH 11) Samuel Hays b. 1836 OH 12) Isaac Hays 1842 m Mary Mitchel of Monroe CO. OH

1) Mary M. Hays 1860 2) Sarah Elizabeth Hays 1862 3) Mary A. Hays 1867 4) William A. Hays 1868 5) James Hays 6) Nancy Hays m Phillips

5) Elizabeth Hays 1764 NC (John1, Charles2,David3,Moses4) 6) Alexander Hays - fought alongside brothers in Cont. War 7) Thomas Hays 1765 (John1, Charles2,David3,Moses4) 8) David Hays m. Martha Fulton- fought alongside brothers in Cont. War 9) Phoebe Hays 1766 m John Brownlee -ceremony preformed by

10) Joseph Hays 1768 NC (John1, Charles2,David3,Moses4)

11) Mary 1770 NC (John1, Charles2,David3,Moses4) died in youth 12) James S. Hays 1772 – WILL Aug. CO. VA 1787 d. 1812 m. Mary Buster

1)৚vid Hays 1790 2) John Hays 1791 m. Jean of Allegheny County, Penn.

1. Gabriel Hays 2. John Hays d. 1812 3. Ichnand Hays d. 1812 4. Jess Hays 5.œharity Hays 6. Grace Hays 7.žlizabeth Hays 8.šnne Hays 9. William Hays became a farmer after the war 3) Thomas Hays 1793Allegheny County, Penn. 4) William Hays 1795 died young 5) James Hays 1796 m. Elizabeth had many Descendants Will Allegheny CO. Penn. 1864 – Documented and proven Allegheny CO. Penn.

1.žliza Hays 2. James hays 3. Nancy Hays 4. Samuel Hays 5.৚vid Hays m Manerva Jackson 1835 Had 12 Children: 1. Martha Frances Hays 1837 2. Elizabeth Leannah Hays 1871 3. Eliza Ann Hays 4. James Lambert Hays 5. Nancy James Hays 6. Mary Louise Hays 7. John Butler Hays 8. William Franklin Hays m. Callie Witherspoon

1. William Witherspoon Hays m Marie Louie Shafer Had 2 known children:

10. Andrew Jackson Hays 1855 11. Daniel Jackson Hays 1858 12. Robert Lee Hays 1863

6) Sara Ann Hays1798 (John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James) 7) Malinda Hays Hays 1799 (John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James) 8) Mary Hays Hays 1799(John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James) 9)žlizabeth Hays Hays 1801(John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James) 10) Isaac Hays Hays1803 (John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James) 11) Nathaniel Hays 1804 (John1, Charles2, David3, Moses4,James)

3) James Hays 1740 m. (John1, Charles2) soldier in the Battle of Monmouth in 1778

1. Nicholas Hays 2. John Hays 3. James Hays 4. Lewis Hays 5.žlivia Hays m. Stifty 6. Sylvia Hays m. Longacre 7.žlizabeth Hays 8. William Hays m. Susannah Boone daughter of Daniel Boone and Rebecca Bryon VA. Will and documented Hays/Simms Children: 1.žlizabeth Hays 2. Jeremiah Hays 3. William Hays 4. Susannah Hays 5.৞linda hays 6.›oone Hays 7.৚niel Hays 8. Greenup Hays 9. Hahala Hays 10. Jesse hays 9. Maria Hays 10. Enoch Hays 11. Clayton Hays

4) Robert Hays 1769 Anderson TENN. (John1, Charles2) 5) Andrew Hays 1773 (John1, Charles2) 6) Joseph Hays 1734 (John1, Charles2) soldier in the Battle of Monmouth in 1778 7) Rebecca Hays 1745 (John1, Charles2) m. John C. Thomas 1815

1. William Hays m. Elizabeth

1. John Hays m 1) Janette Hays Mills (Jane) KY. Became Capt. John Hays in Revolutionary War Had 7 Children: 1. Elizabeth Hays 2. Barbara Hays 3. Jacob Hays

1. Nancy Gilmore Hays 2. Isaac Hays m Susan Anderson

The Gold Rush made it seem like a wonderful place to go to Oregon and “Gilmore and Naomi took off on a wagon train with their family of 7 children. A small child was sick on another wagon and Naomi went to aid and helped the child. Turned out the child had German measles and later Naomi and 3 of her children became sick. Three of their sons died and were buried along the trail as well as Naomi herself, Gilmore continued on with his 6 remaining children. The town they arrived to was 2 buildings and planks to walk over the mud, mud everywhere along with the worst winter conditions possible to endure, losing his wife and sons, no gold to be found, made it seem this journey had been a mistake. Gilmore fought in the Indian war of 1855, He became a Major and after the war he went to Idaho for gold once again, never finding any and returned to Oregon just weeks before he died 1880. 1. Isabella Hays 2. Barbara Hays 3. Elizabeth Hays 4. Lee Hays 5. Nancy A. Hays 6. Charles M. Hays - died young on trail 7. Minerve Hays - died young on trail 8. William Hays - died young on trail 9. Eleanor Hays

1. Joseph Hays m. Talathi Hordy had 6 children 2. John Hays 3. Mary Polly Hays m Benjamin Lampson of MO. 4. James W. Hays d 1817 in Rockbridge CO.VA. 5. Sarah Sallie Hays m. James Mc Crosky had 9 children 6.šndrew Hays died 1820 7. Mary Margaret Hays 8.œharles Hays m. Sara Wilson had 3 children m. Mary Blair Walker had 10 children Children: 1.žmily Hays b. 1818 2. James C Hays b. 1826 3.œlarinda Hays b. 1828 4. Sarah Hays b. 1834 5. Mary Walker Hays b. 1839 6. Joseph Walker Hays b 1854 7. John S. Hays 1858 8.žlizabeth Hays 9. Joseph Hays 10.œharles B. Hay’s m. Sarah Provine children: Mary, William, George and Edwin - took spelling Hayes of KY and MO. 11. George W. Hays 12. William H. Hays 13.žlmira Hays 9. George Campbell Hays

3) Robert Hays b.1757 d. 1768 (John1, Charles2David3) m. Jane Montgomery Will Green Co TENN. my will and desire after the decease of my said wife Jane M. Hays, that all the personal estate that shall or may remain over after the decease of her they said Jane Hays which I have bequeathed to her as aforesaid shall be equally divided between my three sons and two daughters Charles J. Hays ,John Hays, Thomas Hays, Margaret Rodgers wife of James Rodgers and Susannah Smith wife of Robert Smith Most of the Hays (Hayes) children spent their lives close to their parents in Greene county and in nearby Washington county, Tennessee. However three of the Hays children, Hamilton, Patrick and Rhoda moved to Atchison County, Missouri to make their homes.

1)œharles Joseph Hays 1800-1874 m. Elizabeth Neil Hays Had 11 Children and many descendants in Missouri and TN. 1. Hamilton Hays m. Easter Carson

2. Margaret Hays m. Charles Shanks 3. Robert Hays died at birth 4. Thomas Hays m. Elizabeth Jane Mullins 5. Patrick Hays m. Rhonda English 6. Mary Hays m. Hale Thompson 7. John H, Hays m. Jane Fraker 8. Jane Hays 9. Rhonda Hays 10.œharles Neil Hays m.Isabel McRoberts 11. Reuben Henry Hays m .Daisy Million 2) Thomas Hays 3) Margaret Hays m. James Rodgers 4) Susannah Hays m. Robert Smith 5) John Hays m. Mary Ann Rhia 1843 Had Children: (children born Green Co., TN.) 1. William Hays 1843 2. Nancy Hays 1846 3. David S. Hays 1848 4. James E. Hays 1850 5. Mary J Hays 1852 6. Francis M. Hays 1854 7. Thomas Allen Hays 1856 8. Samuel M Hays 1858 9. Annie E. Hays 1862

1. Barbara Hays 1763 died in youth 2. David Hays 1765 m. Mary Collier sister of Susannah 1793 3. Hugh Hays 1766 m. Susannah Collier 1795 4. James T, Hays 1767 m. Malinda KNIGHT Wilson CO. TENN.

5. Robert Hays 1769 Wilson CO., TENN. 6. Andrew Hays 1770 – 1773 m. Sarah Simms recorded Augusta CO.VA. 7. John Hays JR. b. 1771 m .Rebecca Maxwell of TENN. (John1, John2Charles3) known as: “Hermitage John” Sold land in VA. - Died 1811 in Wilson CO., TENN.

Ancestry Birth Record Files, have it proven, that John Hays and Rebecca Maxwell Hays, the former Mrs. Maxwell, were the parents of Harmon Hays: who fathered John Coffee Hays b. 28 Jan 1817 Little Cedar Lick, Wilson Co., TN., d. 21 Apr 1883 – there is conflicting information about the parents of Jack Hays, but it is well documented by the Sims of VA. Jack Hays, was the son of Rebecca Maxwell, wife of John Hays of TENN., land deeds proven to be in TENN.

1) * John Hays ( Jack Hays Texas Ranger) 1817-1883 Jack Hays was born 28 January 1817 at Cedar Lick in Wilson County, Tennessee. By the age of fifteen he had moved to Mississippi and began to learn surveying. By mid-1836 Hays was in Texas where he joined a Ranger company under Erastus "Deaf" Smith. He took part in a skirmish with the Mexican Cavalry and assisted in the capture of Juan Sánchez. He was appointed deputy surveyor of the Bexar District. Hays combined his knowledge of Indian warfare with his rangering. John Coffee Hays helped to forge the legend of what a Texas Ranger was. Arriving in Texas in 1836 but just missing the famous battles of the Texas Revolution, nineteen-year-old Hays soon had Sam Houston urging him to join a new group of Rangers.

In 1840, Hays was appointed a captain of the Rangers. He proved himself to be a fearless fighter and a good leader of men. John Coffee Hays, known all his life as Jack, most of his adult life as Captain Jack, was born January 28th, 1817 in Little Cedar Lick, Tennessee. (Now is Nashville.) When he died on San Jacinto Day in 1883, he was one of the largest land-holders and wealthiest men in California. With his will, he gave much of his ranch to California. The Hays Ranch became the University of California at Berkeley. Yellow Fever took both of Jack’s parents in 1832. He and his siblings were parceled out among relatives. Jack and a younger brother and sister ended up with Uncle Robert Cage in Yazoo, Mississippi. And Jack was unhappy. He had to leave Nashville’s Davidson Academy, where he was the fastest runner and best horseman. Kindly old Uncle Robert wanted to make him a storekeeper. Note: "John C. Hays, known in Texas as Jack Hays, was born at Little Cedar Lick, Wilson County, Tennessee, on January 28, 1817. He was from the same section of the country as the McCullochs, Sam Houston, and Andrew Jackson, and was the same adaptable sort of person. Jack's father, Harmon Hays, fought with Jackson and named his son for General John Coffee, one of Jackson's trusted officers. Hays came to Texas in 1837 or in the early part of 1838--then about 21 years of age--and took up his residence at San Antonio. Some accounts say that he joined the Texas Rangers and fought Indians and Mexicans under Deaf Smith and Henry W. Karnes 2) Mary Ann 1818 m. J.C. Lewis (John1, John2,Charles3,John4,Harmon5) 3) Sarah Hays1829 m Calvin Lea Hammond son John Hays Hammond

4) Harry Hays 1821 m. Bettie Cage (John1, John2,Charles3,John4,Harmon5) 5) Robert Hays 1822 (John1, John2,Charles3,John4,Harmon5) 6) John Hays 1824 m. unknown (John1, John2,Charles3,John4,Harmon5)

1) Robert Hays 2) Joseph Hays 3)৚vid Hays 4) William Hays 5) James Hays 6) Henry Hays 7) Nancy Hays m. Morrow 8) Jane Hays m. Moss 9) Lettice Williams Hays 10) William Hays 7) Jane Hays (John1, John2,Charles3,John4,Harmon5) 3) John Hays 1756 (John1, John2) The Hays Family of Breathitt County is one of the first groups of white people to ever settle in this section of Eastern Kentucky. Family tradition has it that William Hays •• (2nd known generation), and his family from Rockbridge County, Virginia came to Eastern Kentucky in the year 1791. They settled on Holly Creek in that part of Madison County, Kentucky which later became Breathitt County (1839) and today is located in eastern Wolfe County. William was the Grandson of old John Hays ••(1st known generation) of Virginia who served in the Virginia Militia during the French and Indian War (1754-1763). His father was married to Nancy Jane Wood, the daughter of Lysander and Elias Wood of North Carolina. M1. Nancy Jane A. Wood of NC M 2. Ursula Haddix of Russell CO.,VA daughter of Jane Tate

1.ভrian Hays 1808 m. 1. Elizabeth Cockrell m. 2. Millie Alley 2. William Hays m. Delilah Robinson 3. Sarah “Sally” Hays m. Willey Mcquinn 4. Nicholas Hays m. Mary Allen – son John C.B. Hays – Nicholas Hays owned the present site of Quicksand community when in 1839 it was first chosen to be the site of the soon to be established county seat of Jackson. However, because he did not have a clear deed to the land, the site for Jackson was moved three miles downstream to the present location where other family members lived. 5. Phillip Hays m1. Nancy Stacy m 2. Susan Miller of GA.

1. Jane Hays 1821 m. Joshua Barnett 2. Sarah Hays m. John Wells of KY. 3. Nancy Hays m. David Barnett 4. William Hays m. Polly Miller - William moved with his family to the Snowden Branch area of Breathitt County near the mouth of Quicksand Creek. (The old Hays Cemetery on top of Snowden Branch Hill has hundreds of graves. Most have only field stones for tombstones. It is almost certain that William and most of his family are buried beneath the ground here. Many of the readable stones are marked with names of Hayes of long ago.) Had 9 Children: 1.žlizabeth Hays 1851 2. John Charles Hays 1852 m. Prudence Little had 7 children and many descendants. 3. Sarah Ellen Hays 1855 m. John C.B, Hays (son of Nicholas)had 6 children and many descendants. 4. George Martin Hays 1857 m. Jane Mc Pherson 5. Nancy Hays 1859 m. Breckenridge Flinchum – brother of John Flinchum 6. Henley Hays 1862 – no 7.šnna Hays 1868 m. John B. Flinchum- records brother of Breckenridge Flinchum 8. William Hays 1869 9.šmanda Hays 1870

5.ভrian Hays moved to ARK. M. Delilah Fugale 6. John Butter Hays m.1 Sarah Miller m.2 Catherine McIntosh

1) John Hays ( 1787 – 1821) m. Susannah Snow 1908

1)৚ughter Hays ( 1810 - ) m. John Claspil 2) James B. Hayes ( 1817- ) m. Nancy Bridges 3) Martha A. Hays ( 1821- ) m. Andrew Long

1)Ÿrances Hays m. Thomas Gilmore 2) Mary Hays m. McCoy 3) William Harrison Hays (1818-) 4) Margret Hays ( died in childbirth) m. John S. Waddell 5) Jestright Hays ( !820-1820) 6) Susannah Hays ( 1823- ) m. John S. Waddell 6) William Hays Jr. ( -1824) m. Nancy Newport 1815

1. Reed Newport Hays ( - ) m. Matilda

2.৚niel W. Hays (1822-1880) m. Elizabeth Hays 1841

7) Shadrack Hays (1794-1843) m. Sarah Osborne 1816 (Nancy Newport’s sister) - m. Elizabeth Newport 1823 Shadrack and Elizabeth Newport HAYS. The widow Elizabeth migrated from KY to Dade Co, MO. 1860 Census Morgan Twp: Elizabeth abt 1800 TN, son John 1832 KY, and daughter Elizabeth 1842 KY

And background on PDF files H/W Decatureville TENN. Outside of Memphis TENN.

5)* Samuel Hays b. 1754 ( John1, John2) who married Elizabeth from Ireland, lived on the land deeded to them by his father 1769 lived on the James River in Virginia (started out with 100 acres of land on the James River in the Borden Tract),relocated to TENN. With the family after the British burned their property. In 1779, Samuel and Elizabeth sold their lands to William Thompson (after their homestead was burned by the British forces. Samuel remained here until 1798 when he and his family moved to Davidson CO., TN. To be near his brothers and families. TN Will recorded these family members. NOTE from Hermitage House records: Samuel Hays, who owned the land just south of his brother, Nathaniel, was in Davidson County by 1780, built the fortified Hays Stations on Stoner's Creek ca.1782-83, and was killed by the Creek Indians nearby in early 1793. His wife Elizabeth continued to reside at Hays Station until selling it in 1807 and then moved to neighboring Wilson County, TN. Her sons Campbell, Andrew, Hugh – these are the sons of Hays Station- Davidson County TENN.

1) Andrew Jackson Hays 1744 made Lieutenant in the Rev. War militia, son of

2) Campbell Thomas Hays - son of Samuel and Elizabeth 3) * Huge Hays - son of Samuel and Elizabeth: Hugh Hays, who owned the land grant north of Nathaniel Hays, and who lived in Greene County when he sold it to Jackson and William Donelson (Rachel Jackson's brother) in 1795-96. He and Nathaniel applied for their adjoining land grants on the EXACT same day in 1785 and received them on the EXACT same day in 1786 Hugh HAYS 1845 will book #147 m. Polly Tate Hugh HAYS of Wilson m. Polly TATE named in his father-in-law's probate papers in Clark Co., AR 1836. Anderson TATE d. c1835. Wilson Co TN WIlls Books 1-13 1802-http://genforum.familytreemaker.com/guill/messages/188.html PG 147 Hugh Hays will 14 Apr 1845 Heirs: Polly Hays wife, dau. Rachel M Seaborn to receive the land that Isaac N Seaborn lives on: Sons Samuel A and Richard L Hays: grandchildren Willed: Baratt Guill & John Danson Recorded 11 Aug 1845 p.179. (My notes - PROVEN: Hugh and Mary (Polly) HAYS children: Samuel A .and Richard L. Hays. Also a marriage recorded in Wilson Co., TN by MG R. S. Tate: Isaac R. Seaburn-Rachel M. Hayes 20 Nov 1833. Hugh HAYS was taxed in Wilson Co., TN from 1827-1829). WAR of 1812 record: Hugh HAYS, War of 1812 Invalid file #20380 by Polly (TATE) HAYS, widow WO 30979, WC19345. He was an ensign in Capt. Richard Tate's Co., TN Militia enlisted 28 Sep 1814, discharged 27 Apr 1815. Widow lived in 1850-1859 Wilson Co., TN, 1855 Davidson Co., TN, 1878 Mt. Juliet, Wilson Co., TN. He died 23 May 1845. HAYS, Hugh, (wife) Polly (TATE) m. 16 May 1816 Wilson Co., TN - WC-19345, Old War IF-#20380. He died 23 May 1845, served Capt. .Richard Tate's Co. TN Militia as an Ensign. Widow lived Wilson Co., TN 1850-78.

6) *Col. Robert Hayes (1802-1840) ( John1, John2) m. Jane Collier Oct 3, 1799 Green CO. Tenn. Lick Creek Will Greene CO., TENN. 4 Jan. 1841, MINS 19 PG. 194 See Hays/Hayes/Sims: Robert’s Will: Unto my wife Jane Hays is one of the legal heirs and Representatives of Sarah Glasscock deceased and the said Sarah Glasscock having died possessed of a considerable estate In Washington county Tennessee therefore it is my will and desire that my wife Jane Hays shall take and receive the money That is coming to her from the estate of the said Sarah Glasscock deceased and that she shall have the sole use and inherits of The money for her support and it is also my will and desire that my executors shall use all lawful ways and means to have the Money collected and paid over to my wife the said Jane Hays as soon as possible. I give and devise unto my youngest son Thomas Hays his heirs and assigns all the lands whereon I now live situate lying and being in Green county on the long fork of Lick Creek and adjoining the land of Nathan Morelock, and Samuel Crawford, and Alexander English and Charles Hays, containing by estimation two hundred acres more or less to hold to him the said Thomas Hays his heirs and assigns forever. Seventhly I give and bequeath unto my son John Hays one bay horse called Dick, a certain tract or parcel of land situate lying and being in Green Co. on the Long Fork of Lick Creek adjoining my land where I now live and the land and the land of Robert C. Gray and the land of Nathan Morelock containing by estimation seventy five acres. Unto my daughter Margaret wife of James Rodgers the sum of four hundred dollars that is one hundred dollars to be paid within two years from the time of my decease the other three hundred dollars to be paid annually. Unto my daughter Susannah wife of Robert Smith the sum of four hundred dollars that is one hundred dollars to be paid within two years from the time of my decease, the other three hundred dollars to be paid annually. I will and order that all my lands before mentioned mentioned and bequeathed by me to my son Thomas Hays, and Charles Hays shall be valued and upon such valuation being made if there should be a deficiency after my said daughters have received the four hundred dollars each from my son Thomas Hays so as to make them my said daughters equal in shares with my sons the said Thomas Hays and Charles Hays shall pay my said daughters in proportion to the amount of the evaluation of their said land and also if my son John Hays has been advanced over what will make him equal with my son Thomas Hays and Charles Hays and my two daughters Margaret and Susannah. ** There is a lot of confusion between Robert and wife Jane Donelson Hays and Robert wife Jane Collier, and the connection with The Hermitage House Of Tenn. – it is important to follow Wills Land Documents and written facts for true linage and connection. The Hermitage House Samuel, Nathaniel, William are brothers to Col. Robert Hays. Robert and Samuel’s children are Campbell, Hugh, Charles and Thomas. - Thomas Hays (Thomas and Charles grew up at Hays Station, and became wards of Andrew Jackson in the 1790s, and moved to Wilson County, TN before 1800./ some of their sons served under Jackson in the Creek Indian Wars of 1813-14

6.œharles Hays m . 7. Margaret Hays m. James Rodgers 8. Susannah Hays m. Robert Smith 9. Thomas m. ?

1) Jeanette Hayes m. William Campbell (John1,John2,Robert3) 2) Sarah Hays m. Alexander Montgomery (John1,John2,Robert3) 3) * Campbell Hays (John1,John2,Robert3) served in the Civil War

4) Elizabeth Hays m. Moses Findley (John1,John2,Robert3) 5) * Charles Leonidas Hays m. Mornig Enocks of Nashville TN.

1. Samuel Jackson Hays m. Rachel Tate Hays –

1. Jasper Tate Hays 2. Eleanor Hays m Wade 3. Samuel Newton Hays 4. Hugh Leonidas Hays 5. Andrew Jackson Hays (Namesake of President) 6. Mary Dora Hays 1801 7. James Hays 1803 8. Eleanor Mornig Hays 1804 9. Elizabeth Ann Hays 1804 10. John Hays (b. 1805-1881) m. Margaret Evans

1) Will P. Hayes 1861 2) Mary Susannah Hayes 1865 3) Sarah Melissa Hayes 1867 4) Margaret Hayes 1869 5) Sam Hayes 1883 6) Julia Hayes

1. Bella R. Hays m. A. Parker

5. John Hays and wife Lydia Simms (John1, John2, Robert3)

1) David Hays 2) William Hays m. Elizabeth HAYS (HAYES), William - Old War IF-#8659, served Capt. Slatton's Co., TN Militia as a pvt. 3) Johanna Hays –m Buchanan 4)žleanor Hays –m. Paxton 5) Hannah Hays - m. Sawyer 6) Robert Hays 7) Mary Hays –m. Lapsley

1.œharles Hays 2. Patsy Hays 3. Nathaniel Hays JR. 4. Jane Hays

as well, where the Hermitage is now. His house, including the famous Hermitage Mansion, the Hermitage Church, and Andrew Jackson Donelson’s Tulip Grove Mansion, is all located on Nathaniel Hays' original land Grant. It has been determine through research and land deeds, that Hugh Hays was living in Greene County, TN when he sold his 640-acres land grant to William Donelson & Andrew Jackson in 1795-96. (They bought it for William's brother and Andrew' business partner Samuel Donelson--Rachel Jackson's Brother, to Move to so he could be closer to the family —NOTE: The evidence proves that Andrew Jackson Built the original log Hermitage "from scratch" in The summer of 1804, Nevertheless, it is proven by land deeds, that the Hays family owned the land that became the Hermitage is very important to my project and the story completion.

1.œharles Payton Hays b. 1842 in TN. 2. Harriett Minerva hays 3. Ruth Ellen Hays 4.Ÿrances Malinda Hays 5. John Randolph Hays 6. John P. Hays 7.žliza Florence hays 8.৚vid Huston Hays

9) Rebecca Hays 1725 m William Richardson of Smyth CO.,VA. (John1)

James Hays 1738 (John1,James2) 1) m. Rebecca m Sara Knowles - Smith Hays 1817 HAYS, James, 09 Jul 1802, 100ac, See Brooks, James and Hays, James Grants 50, 1802-03, p.189: James Hayes related to Col Robert Hays, Maj. William Hays, Lt. Samuel Hays, Lt. John Hays and Maj. Emphriam, officers of many battles in Virginia, Carolina’s and Tenn. He moved to Davidson TN after the Indian Upheavals in Rockbridge Co., VA. and married Rebecca 1817 of TN. – had 10 children and moved to Warren CO. KY to protect his family – due to the British fighting the colonies ( Rev. War). Rebecca died in child birth, he remarried Sara (Knowles) Smith-Hays and relocated to Montgomery CO. MO. Purchased 800 acres land – this was also the arrival date of some of James’s family, in 1830,to live in M., the families, lived on James land in Montgomery CO. MO., for many years – to avoid more battles. Despite their acceptance of slavery, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri did not join the Confederacy. James and wife Sarah, lived the rest of their lives and died in MO. Some of James Hays family moved back to TN and to the colonies, where many fought in the Civil War 1863 | 1864 | 865 ***** James HAYS 1832 will book 10 #32

1. James Hays Jr. deeded land in VA.by Grandfather – John Hays

2. Rebecca Hays 3. Charles Hays d. 1818 m. Elizabeth of MISS. Will date 13 May 1819 and was probated Aug. 1820. (Probate Record Book F, page 345, 26 Sept. 1820: State of Tennessee Smith County

1. John Hays 2. Joseph Hays 3. Samuel Hays 4. William Hays 5. James Hays 6.šndrew Hays 7. Hugh Hays 8. Nathaniel Hays 9. Mary Hays 10.žlizabeth Hays

1) Alsey O Hayes (1848 - ) 2) John Cox Hayes (1849-1894 )m. Delena Hopper 3) Silas Bond Hayes ( Aug. 11,1853-1833 )m. Susan Webb 4) Elizabeth Hayes ( 1855-1936) 5) Thomas L. Hayes ( 1858-1901) m. Mariah Reneau 6. 6) Susan Hays (1863 - )

7. 8) Madison Cotton Hays (1864 - December 9, 1931) m. Mary Leach 9) William Robert Hayes (Dec. 25, 1859 – 1938) Tippah Miss. m. Mollie O.

1)াttie Hayes (November 24, 1882 - August 17, 1885) 2) Robert Lee Hayes (December 10, 1885 - May 12, 1966) m. Jessie McElyea 3) Frankie Cleveland Hayes (April 19, 1888 - November 3, 1892) 4) John Thomas Hayes (November 22, 1892 - September 14,

1) Lynda Gail (Hayes) m. Stoffel--Burilson ( - ) Had 3 Children: 1) Jeffery Keith (Stoffel--Burilson) Burilson

6) Melvin Franklin Hayes (November 29, 1923 - July 20,

1) Matthew Timothy Hayes (Sept.25, 1979-) Non- Married Relationship with Bethany Dahlstrom:


Members of Easy Company, 506th PIR [ edit | edit source ]

Officers [ edit | edit source ]

  • Major General Salve H. Matheson (1st Platoon leader from unit formation later promoted to Regimental S-4 eventually commanded the 101st Airborne Division in the late 1960s and the 2nd Infantry Division in the early 1970s)
  • Colonel Edward D. Shames (3rd Platoon leader from Holland to the end of war)
  • Lt. Colonel Norman S. Dike, Jr. (Fifth C.O. of Easy Company, later relieved of command and transferred to Division HQ)
  • Lt. Colonel Clarence Hester (First X.O. of Easy Company later promoted to 2nd Battalion S-3, and then 1st Battalion C.O.)
  • Lt. Colonel Herbert Sobel (First C.O. of Easy Company later reassigned to Chilton Foliat, and then 2nd Battalion S-4) (Third C.O. of Easy Company later promoted to 2nd Battalion X.O. and then C.O.)
  • Captain Jack E. Foley (1st Platoon leader from Bastogne to Germany later 2nd Platoon leader in Austria)
  • Captain Lewis Nixon (Later promoted to 2nd Battalion S-2 and then Regimental S-2)
  • Captain Ronald C. Speirs (Sixth C.O. of Easy Company initially from Dog Company)
  • 1st Lieutenant Thomas Meehan III (Second C.O. of Easy Company initially from Baker Company. KIA 6 June 1944)
  • 1st Lieutenant Robert B. Brewer (WIA in Holland)
  • 1st Lieutenant Lynn D. Compton (2nd Platoon leader from Holland to Bastogne evacuated due to "trench foot")
  • 1st Lieutenant Robert H. Cowing
  • 1st Lieutenant James K. Davis (Second X.O. of Easy Company)
  • 1st Lieutenant Roy Paul Gates
  • 1st Lieutenant Frederick T. Heyliger (Fourth C.O. of Easy Company later severely wounded in Holland from friendly fire)
  • 1st Lieutenant Sterling W. Horner
  • 1st Lieutenant Richard M. Hughes II
  • 1st Lieutenant Henry Jones (Later transferred to Battalion HQ, Died in Germany 21 July 1947)
  • 1st Lieutenant George Lavenson (Transferred to Battalion HQ, WIA in Carentan)
  • 1st Lieutenant C. Carwood Lipton
  • 1st Lieutenant Robert I. Matthews (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • 1st Lieutenant Walter L. Moore (3rd Platoon leader from unit formation later transferred to Pathfinders)
  • 1st Lieutenant Francis L. O'Brien (KIA December 1944)
  • 1st Lieutenant Thomas A. Peacock
  • 1st Lieutenant Ben M. Perkins
  • 1st Lieutenant John E. Pisanchin
  • 1st Lieutenant Warren R. Roush (2nd Platoon leader until Normandy later 3rd Platoon leader until Holland. Transferred to Able Company)
  • 1st Lieutenant Raymond G. Schmitz (KIA 22 September 1944)
  • 1st Lieutenant Patrick J. Sweeney (X.O. of Easy Company in England)
  • 1st Lieutenant Harry F. Welsh (1st Platoon leader in Normandy later X.O. until Mourmelon, then transferred to Battalion HQ)
  • 2nd Lieutenant Archibald Smith Barnwell
  • 2nd Lieutenant James L. Diel (KIA 19 September 1944)
  • 2nd Lieutenant Charles A. Hudson (WIA in Nuenen)
  • 2nd Lieutenant Charles R. Rexrode

Enlisted men [ edit | edit source ]

  • 1st Sergeant William S. Evans (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • 1st Sergeant John C. Lynch (First Sergeant after Talbert)
  • 1st Sergeant Harvey H. Morehead (cadre, 1st Sgt.)
  • Technical Sergeant Burton P. Christenson
  • Technical Sergeant Donald G. Malarkey
  • Technical Sergeant Amos J. Taylor
  • Staff Sergeant Floyd M. Talbert (First Sergeant after Lipton)
  • Staff Sergeant Joseph E. Stedman (cadre, 1st Pl. Sgt.)
  • Staff Sergeant Norman A. Ford (cadre, 2nd Pl. Sgt.)
  • Staff Sergeant Steven A. Kudla (cadre, 3rd Pl. Sgt.)
  • Staff Sergeant Charles E. Grant (Severely wounded in head)
  • Staff Sergeant William J. Guarnere (WIA in Bastogne)
  • Staff Sergeant Earl L. Hale
  • Staff Sergeant Albert L. Mampre
  • Staff Sergeant John W. Martin
  • Staff Sergeant Leo J. Matz
  • Staff Sergeant Darrell C. Powers
  • Staff Sergeant Murray B. Roberts (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Staff Sergeant Frank J. Soboleski
  • Staff Sergeant J.B. Stokes
  • Staff Sergeant Joseph J. Toye (WIA in Bastogne)
  • Staff Sergeant Robert T. Smith (HQ Supply Sgt.)
  • Staff Sergeant Joseph P. Whitecavage
  • Staff Sergeant Earl E. McClung
  • Staff Sergeant Robert K. Marsh
  • Staff Sergeant Herman E. Hanson
  • Sergeant James H. Alley, Jr.
  • Sergeant Roderick Bain
  • Sergeant Paul L. Becker
  • Sergeant Leo D. Boyle (WIA in "the Island")
  • Sergeant Gordon F. Carson
  • Sergeant James Monroe "Tex" Combs, Jr.
  • Sergeant Bernard S. Cunningham
  • Sergeant Lloyd D. Guy
  • Sergeant Taskel Ellis
  • Sergeant Hanes
  • Sergeant Hayden
  • Sergeant Haynes
  • Sergeant J.D. Henderson
  • Sergeant Walter L. Hendrix
  • Sergeant Sherman M. Irish
  • Sergeant William F. Kiehn (KIA 10 February 1945)
  • Sergeant Clancy Odel Lyall
  • Sergeant Robert A. Mann (First Sergeant in Alsace)
  • Sergeant Thomas A. McCreary
  • Sergeant Kenneth D. Mercier
  • Sergeant Warren H. Muck, (KIA 10 January 1945)
  • Sergeant Elmer L. Murray, Jr. (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Sergeant Richard E. Owen (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Sergeant Robert J. Rader
  • Sergeant Denver Randleman
  • Sergeant Robert Burr Smith
  • Sergeant Myron Ranney (Wounded in Holland)
  • Sergeant Carl N. Riggs (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Sergeant Paul C. Rogers
  • Sergeant James B. Sholty
  • Sergeant Wayne A. Sisk
  • Sergeant Roderick G. Strohl
  • Sergeant Clarence M. Tridle
  • Sergeant Richard M. Wright
  • Sergeant Robert E. Wynn
  • Sergeant Arthur C. Youman
  • Technician 4th Grade George Luz, Sr.
  • Technician 4th Grade Frank J. Perconte
  • Technician 4th Grade Charles E. Rhinehart
  • Technician 4th grade Eugene Roe, Sr.
  • Technician 4th Grade Richard C. Rowles
  • Technician 4th Grade Carl C. Sawosko (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Technician 4th Grade Benjamin J. Stoney (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Corporal Kenneth T. Baldwin
  • Corporal Antoine P. Bostons
  • Corporal Sextron I. Dickers
  • Corporal James V. Benton
  • Corporal James D. Campbell (KIA 8 October 1944)
  • Corporal William Dukeman, Jr. (KIA 5 October 1944)
  • Corporal John P. Fieguth
  • Corporal Walter S. Gordon, Jr. (Severely wounded in back, paralyzed)
  • Corporal Forrest L. Guth
  • Corporal George Higgins
  • Corporal A.P. Herron (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Corporal Donald B. Hoobler (KIA 3 January 1945)
  • Corporal Donald L. King
  • Corporal Thomas Maitland
  • Corporal Francis J. Mellet (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Corporal Stanley F. Motowski
  • Corporal Lavon P. Reese
  • Corporal Harvey G. Robinson
  • Corporal Edward H. Stein
  • Technician 5th Grade Leopollo P. Carillo
  • Technician 5th Grade Herman F. Collins (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Technician 5th Grade William A. Howell
  • Technician 5th Grade Joseph D. Liebgott
  • Technician 5th Grade John G. Mayer
  • Technician 5th Grade William C. Maynard
  • Technician 5th Grade John McGrath
  • Technician 5th Grade Leslie R. Pace
  • Technician 5th Grade Campbell T. Smith
  • Technician 5th Grade Ralph I. Stafford
  • Technician 5th Grade William H. Wagner
  • Technician 5th Grade Jerry A. Wentzel (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Technician 5th Grade Ralph H. Wimer (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Technician 5th Grade Antonio C. Garcia
  • Private First Class Aldrich
  • Private First Class Raymond L. Ballew
  • Private First Class Conrad M. Bay
  • Private First Class Salvatore F. Bellino
  • Private First Class Edward J. Bernat
  • Private First Class Burden
  • Private First Class Thomas H. Burgess (Severely wounded in throat)
  • Private First Class Matthew J. Carlino
  • Private First Class Maxwell M. Clark
  • Private First Class Vincent S. Collette
  • Private First Class Seth O. Crosby
  • Private First Class Richard P. Davenport
  • Private First Class Edward J. Donahue
  • Private First Class Carl F. Eckstrom
  • Private First Class Carl J. Fenstermaker
  • Private First Class George V. Fernandez
  • Private Bradford C. Freeman
  • Private First Class Gerald L. Flurie
  • Private First Class Richard R. Garrod
  • Private First Class John E. Gathings
  • Private First Class Jack O. Ginn
  • Private First Class Walter E. Hanson
  • Private First Class Siles E. Harrelson
  • Private First Class Dale L. Hartley
  • Private First Class Edward J. Heffron
  • Private First Class Elwood Hertzog
  • Private First Class Hickman
  • Private First Class Joseph E. Hogan
  • Private First Class Walter G. Howard
  • Private First Class Clarence S. Howell
  • Private First Class Hudson
  • Private First Class Warren C. Huntley
  • Private First Class Eugene E. Ivie
  • Private First Class Coburn M. Johnson
  • Private First Class George E. Jones
  • Private First Class Robert Van Klinken (KIA 20 September 1944)
  • Private First Class Kohler
  • Private First Class Harry R. Lager
  • Private First Class Robert T. Leonard
  • Private First Class Quinton E. Lindler
  • Private First Class Dewitt Lowrey
  • Private First Class Arthur J. Mauzerall
  • Private First Class John McBreen
  • Private First Class Walter L. McKay
  • Private First Class James A. McMahon
  • Private First Class William E. Medved
  • Private First Class William T. Miller (KIA 20 September 1944)
  • Private First Class David E. Morris
  • Private First Class Norman W. Neitzke
  • Private First Class Henry E. Nelson
  • Private First Class Ralph J. Orth (Wounded in kneecap by bullet fragment)
  • Private First Class Alex M. Penkala Jr. (KIA 10 January 1945)
  • Private First Class Edwin E. Pepping
  • Private First Class Farris O. Rice
  • Private First Class Woodrow W. Robbins
  • Private First Class John W. Rossman
  • Private First Class Edward F. Sabo
  • Private First Class Elmer N. Schuyler
  • Private First Class John L. Sheehy
  • Private First Class John P. Sheeley
  • Private First Class Garland R. Smith
  • Private First Class Gerald R. Snider
  • Private First Class Paul J. Sullivan
  • Private First Class Edward J. Tipper (Severely wounded in face, legs)
  • Private First Class Felix J. Tokarzewski
  • Private First Class Ralph J. Trapuzzano
  • Private First Class Andrew Uuban
  • Private First Class Alexander Vittorre
  • Private First Class Paul Wagner
  • Private First Class David Kenyon Webster
  • Private First Class James W. Welling
  • Private First Class Daniel B. West
  • Private First Class Melvin O. Winn
  • Private First Class William H. Woodcock
  • Private First Class George F. Yochum
  • Private First Class Frank J. Zastawniak
  • Private First Class Henry C. Zimmerman
  • Private First Class John A. Janovec (Died in car accident, May 1945)
  • Private First Class John T. Julian (KIA 1 January 1945)
  • Private Owen L. Andrews
  • Private Kieth Ansell
  • Private Harvey Baker
  • Private Frederick C. Bealke, Jr.
  • Private Richard F. Berg
  • Private Homer T. Blake
  • Private Albert Blithe (Severely wounded in shoulder)
  • Private Robert J. Bloser (KIA 7 June 1944)
  • Private Donald S. Bond
  • Private Richard L. Bray
  • Private Charles P. Broska
  • Private Earl V. Bruce
  • Private John J. Capoferri
  • Private Ora M. Childers
  • Private Chow
  • Private Robert T. Cipriano
  • Private Roy W. Cobb (Court-martialed insubordination and assault on Lt. Foley)
  • Private James F. Coleman
  • Private James Comba
  • Private John G. Connell
  • Private Conway
  • Private Philip Coviello
  • Private Samuel M. Cowthu
  • Private Cushman
  • Private Damon
  • Private Barry J. Dassault
  • Private Edward R. De Tuncq
  • Private Jay S. Dickerson
  • Private William Dillinger (Transferred)
  • Private Rudolph Dittrich (Died in practice jump, 20 May 1944)
  • Private John Doe
  • Private Joseph Dominquez
  • Private Walter F. Eggert
  • Private George Elliot (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Chester R. Eschenbach
  • Private John L. Eubanks
  • Private John L. Geraghty
  • Private William D. Gier
  • Private Terry G. Giles
  • Private Eugene S. Gilmore
  • Private Milton B. Glass
  • Private Frank B. Grant
  • Private Everett J. Gray (KIA 8 June 1944)
  • Private Genoa H. Griffith
  • Private Stephen E. Grodski
  • Private Stanley L. Hagerman
  • Private Franklin W. Hale
  • Private Elwood Hargroves
  • Private Thomas A. Harrel
  • Private Terrence C. Harris (Transferred to Pathfinders)(KIA 18 June 1944)
  • Private George B. Hartsuff
  • Private Lester A. Hashey (Severely wounded in the back)
  • Private Verlin V. Hawkins
  • Private Harold G. Hayes (KIA December 1944)
  • Private Cyril B. Heckler
  • Private Robert B. Hensley
  • Private George W. Hewitt
  • Private Paul A. Hite
  • Private Owen E. Holbrook
  • Private John R. Holland
  • Private David L. Holton
  • Private Bruce A. Hudgens
  • Private Richard J. Hughes (KIA 9 January 1945)
  • Private Charles F. Hussion
  • Private Eugene E. Jackson (KIA 15 February 1945)
  • Private Robert Jarrett
  • Private Edward J. Joint
  • Private Joseph M. Jordan (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Vernon Jordan
  • Private John R. Korb
  • Private William N. Kratzer
  • Private Paul E. Lamoureux
  • Private Lewis Lampos
  • Private Joseph A. Lesniewski (Evacuated from leg-wound infection)
  • Private Philip E. Longo
  • Private John Lusty
  • Private A. Mahmood
  • Private Walter E. Martin
  • Private Michael V. Massaconi
  • Private Jack F. Matthews
  • Private Edward A. Mauser
  • Private Robert Maxwell
  • Private Carl F. McCauley
  • Private McDonald (Transferred)
  • Private William T. McGonigal (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Joachim Melo
  • Private Ynez M. Mendoza
  • Private Vernon J. Menze (KIA 20 September 1944)
  • Private Max M. Meth
  • Private Elmer T. Meth
  • Private William S. Metzler (KIA June 1944)
  • Private James W. Miller (KIA 20 September 1944)
  • Private John N. Miller (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Franklin Milo
  • Private Elmer J. Minne
  • Private Alfred B. Montes
  • Private Donald J. Moone
  • Private Alton More
  • Private William E. Morris
  • Private Sergio G. Moya (KIA June 6, 1944)
  • Private Gordon L. Neuenfeldt
  • Private Patrick H. Neill (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Private Marshall C. Oliver
  • Private Ernest I. Oates (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Patrick S. O'Keefe
  • Private Gordon H. Oien
  • Private Cecil M. Pace
  • Private Parkes (Transferred)
  • Private Philip P. Perugini
  • Private Cleveland O. Petty
  • Private Roy E. Pickel, Sr.
  • Private David R. Pierce
  • Private John Plesha Jr.
  • Private George L. Potter
  • Private Charles W. Pyle
  • Private Alex R. Raczkowski
  • Private George J. Rajner (KIA July 1944)
  • Private Joseph Ramirez
  • Private Gregory C. Rotella
  • Private James Sarago
  • Private William D. Serila
  • Private John E. Shindell (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Private Urban M. Shirley
  • Private George H. Smith, Jr.
  • Private Gerald B. Snider (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private James L. Sowell
  • Private Ralph F. Spina
  • Private Tomas J. Johnson
  • Private Robert L. Steele
  • Private Joseph Stickley
  • Private Herbert J. Suerth, Jr. (Severely wounded in legs)
  • Private Paul Supko
  • Private Elmer I. Telstad (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private George W. Thomason
  • Private Raymond H. Thompson
  • Private John Toner
  • Private Eugene R. Tremble
  • Private Norman Tremonti
  • Private Allen E. Vest
  • Private Thomas W. Warren (KIA 6 June 1944)
  • Private Kenneth J. Webb (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Private Harold D. Webb (KIA 13 January 1945)
  • Private John M. West
  • Private James W. Wheeler
  • Private White (Transferred)
  • Private Elijah D. Whytsell
  • Private William T. Wingett (Transferred)
  • Private Donald S. Wiseman (Court-martialed, insubordination outcome unknown)
  • Private Ronald V. York
  • Private Jerry G. Young
  • Private Don R. Miller
  • Private Martinez

Barker/Karpis Gang

Alvin “Creepy” Karpis and his Barker brother sidekicks robbed banks and trains and engineered two major kidnappings of rich business executives in the 1930s.

The Hamm Kidnapping

On a warm summer evening in 1933, William A. Hamm, Jr., President of the Theodore Hamm Brewing Company, was working at his office in St. Paul, Minnesota. He had just exited the building when he was grabbed by four shadowed figures and pushed into the back of a car. What he didn't know was that he had been kidnapped by members of the Barker/Karpis gang, for a ransom of over $100,000.

Hamm was taken to Wisconsin, where he was forced to sign four ransom notes. Then he was moved to a hideout in Bensenville, Illinois, were he was held prisoner until the kidnappers had been paid. Once the money was handed over, Hamm was released near Wyoming, Minnesota. The plan was perfect and went off without a hitch. almost.

On September 6, 1933, using a then state-of-the-art technology now called latent fingerprint identification, the FBI Laboratory raised incriminating fingerprints from surfaces that couldn't be dusted for prints. Alvin Karpis, "Doc" Barker, Charles Fitzgerald, and the other members of the gang had gotten away, but they'd left their fingerprints behind—all over the ransom notes.

The Silver Nitrate Method and its application in the Hamm Kidnapping was the first time it was used successfully to extract latent prints from forensic evidence. Scientists had just thought to take advantage of the fact that unseen fingerprints contain perspiration, chock full of sodium chloride (common table salt). By painting the evidence, in this case the ransom notes, with a silver nitrate solution, the salty perspiration reacted chemically to form silver chloride—which is white and visible to the naked eye. There they were: hard evidence that the Karpis gang was behind the kidnapping.  

The Bremer Kidnapping

The second kidnapping of the Barker/Karpis gang targeted a wealthy banker named Edward George Bremer, Jr., who was snatched in St. Paul, Minnesota on January 17, 1934. Bremer was released three weeks later after his family paid $200,000 in ransom. Although he couldn’t identify the culprits, Bremer provided many clues. A key break came when the fingerprint of Arthur “Doc” or “Dock” Barker, a known criminal, turned up on an empty gas can found by a local police officer along the kidnapping route. Soon, a number of Barker’s confederates—including his brother Fred, Karpis, Harry Campbell, Fred Goetz, Russell Gibson, Volney Davis, and others—were linked to the crime.


In order to provide you with the best online experience this website uses cookies.

We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used by Google Analytics, and those social media channels you expressly select by clicking on buttons (links). Cookie policy. I accept cookies from this site.

GDPR compliance/Cookies

[divider type="stripes" margin="20px 0 20px 0" ]

At the top of our website we have displayed a message to warn you that our website makes use of cookies and that one has already been set. By displaying this message we hope that we are providing you with the information you require about our use of cookies, and presenting you with the option to consent to their use. This message will be displayed until such time as you agree to our site using cookies by clicking on the continue button.

1.What is a cookie?

A cookie is a small amount of data, often including a unique identifier, sent to the browser of your computer or mobile phone (referred to here as a "device") from a website's computer. It is stored on your device's hard drive. Each website can send its own cookie to your browser if your browser's preferences allow it. To protect your privacy, your browser only permits a website to access the cookies it has already sent to you, and not the cookies sent to you by other websites. Many websites do this whenever a user visits them to track online traffic flows.

On the Channel Digital website, our cookies record information about your online preferences so we can tailor the site to your interests. You can set your device’s preferences to accept all cookies, notify you when a cookie is issued, or not receive cookies at all. Selecting the last option means you will not receive certain personalised features, which may result in you being unable to take full advantage of all the website's features. Each browser is different, so please check the "Help" menu of your browser to learn how to change your cookie preferences.

During the course of any visit to our website, every page you see, along with a cookie, is downloaded to your device. Many websites do this because cookies enable website publishers to do useful things like find out whether your device (and probably you) has visited the website before. On a repeat visit this is done by the website’s computer checking to see, and finding, the cookie left there on the last visit.

2.How do we use cookies?

Information supplied by cookies can help us analyse the profile of our visitors, which helps us provide you with a better user experience. For example, if on a previous visit you went to our marketing pages, we might find this out from your cookie and highlight marketing information on subsequent visits.

Third party cookies on our pages

Please note that during your visits to our website you may notice some cookies which are unrelated to us. When you visit a page with content embedded from, for example, Twitter or YouTube, you may be presented with cookies from these websites. We do not control the dissemination of these cookies. You should check the third party websites for more information about these.

3.Cookies used on our site

We only use cookies to help us continuously improve our website and maintain a nice browsing experience for our visitors. Here is a list of cookies used on this website:

  • Google Analytics - we use cookies to compile visitor statistics such as how many people have visited our website, what type of technology they are using (e.g. Mac or Windows which helps to identify when our site isn’t working as it should for particular technologies), how long they spend on the site, what page they look at etc.
  • Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ - social media share buttons that enable you to share our content
  • Session cookie - this is a standard cookie just to remember user preferences (like font size and saves you logging in every time you visit)

4.How to delete cookies or control them

This site will not use cookies to collect personally identifiable information about you. However, if you wish to restrict or block cookies set by this or any other website, you can do this through your browser settings. The Help function within your browser should tell you how.


Joseph E. Campbell DE-70 - History

For a much more extensive description than appears on this brief page, see the works listed in the realism bibliography and the bibliographies on William Dean Howells.

Definitions

Broadly defined as "the faithful representation of reality" or "verisimilitude," realism is a literary technique practiced by many schools of writing. Although strictly speaking, realism is a technique, it also denotes a particular kind of subject matter, especially the representation of middle-class life. A reaction against romanticism, an interest in scientific method, the systematizing of the study of documentary history, and the influence of rational philosophy all affected the rise of realism. According to William Harmon and Hugh Holman, "Where romanticists transcend the immediate to find the ideal, and naturalists plumb the actual or superficial to find the scientific laws that control its actions, realists center their attention to a remarkable degree on the immediate, the here and now, the specific action, and the verifiable consequence" (A Handbook to Literature 428).

Many critics have suggested that there is no clear distinction between realism and its related late nineteenth-century movement, naturalism. As Donald Pizer notes in his introduction to The Cambridge Companion to American Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London, the term "realism" is difficult to define, in part because it is used differently in European contexts than in American literature. Pizer suggests that "whatever was being produced in fiction during the 1870s and 1880s that was new, interesting, and roughly similar in a number of ways can be designated as realism, and that an equally new, interesting, and roughly similar body of writing produced at the turn of the century can be designated as naturalism" (5). Put rather too simplistically, one rough distinction made by critics is that realism espousing a deterministic philosophy and focusing on the lower classes is considered naturalism.

In American literature, the term "realism" encompasses the period of time from the Civil War to the turn of the century during which William Dean Howells, Rebecca Harding Davis, Henry James, Mark Twain, and others wrote fiction devoted to accurate representation and an exploration of American lives in various contexts. As the United States grew rapidly after the Civil War, the increasing rates of democracy and literacy, the rapid growth in industrialism and urbanization, an expanding population base due to immigration, and a relative rise in middle-class affluence provided a fertile literary environment for readers interested in understanding these rapid shifts in culture. In drawing attention to this connection, Amy Kaplan has called realism a "strategy for imagining and managing the threats of social change" (Social Construction of American Realism ix).

Characteristics

(from Richard Chase, The American Novel and Its Tradition)

Practitioners

W. D. Howells. As editor of the Atlantic Monthly and of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, William Dean Howells promoted writers of realism as well as those writing local color fiction.

Other Views of Realism

"The basic axiom of the realistic view of morality was that there could be no moralizing in the novel [ . . . ] The morality of the realists, then, was built upon what appears a paradox--morality with an abhorrence of moralizing. Their ethical beliefs called, first of all, for a rejection of scheme of moral behavior imposed, from without, upon the characters of fiction and their actions. Yet Howells always claimed for his works a deep moral purpose. What was it? It was based upon three propositions: that life, social life as lived in the world Howells knew, was valuable, and was permeated with morality that its continued health depended upon the use of human reason to overcome the anarchic selfishness of human passions that an objective portrayal of human life, by art, will illustrate the superior value of social, civilized man, of human reason over animal passion and primitive ignorance" (157). Everett Carter, Howells and the Age of Realism (Philadelphia and New York: Lippincott, 1954).

"Realism sets itself at work to consider characters and events which are apparently the most ordinary and uninteresting, in order to extract from these their full value and true meaning. It would apprehend in all particulars the connection between the familiar and the extraordinary, and the seen and unseen of human nature. Beneath the deceptive cloak of outwardly uneventful days, it detects and endeavors to trace the outlines of the spirits that are hidden there tho measure the changes in their growth, to watch the symptoms of moral decay or regeneration, to fathom their histories of passionate or intellectual problems. In short, realism reveals. Where we thought nothing worth of notice, it shows everything to be rife with significance."
-- George Parsons Lathrop, 'The Novel and its Future," Atlantic Monthly 34 (September 1874):313 24.

“Realism is nothing more and nothing less than the truthful treatment of material.” --William Dean Howells, “Editor’s Study,” Harper's New Monthly Magazine (November 1889), p. 966.

"Realism, n. The art of depicting nature as it is seen by toads. The charm suffusing a landscape painted by a mole, or a story written by a measuring-worm." --Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary (1911)

Context and Controversy

In its own time, realism was the subject of controversy debates over the suitability of realism as a mode of representation led to a critical exchange known as the realism war. (Click here for a brief overview.)

The realism of James and Twain was critically acclaimed in the twentieth century. Howellsian realism fell into disfavor, however, as part of early twentieth century rebellion against the "genteel tradition." For an account of these and other issues, see the realism bibliography and essays by Pizer, Michael Anesko, Richard Lehan, and Louis J. Budd, among others, in the Cambridge Guide to Realism and Naturalism.


Watch the video: Campbell Is Back 1960 (August 2022).