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Anglo-Saxon Burial in England Is Compared to King Tut's Tomb

Anglo-Saxon Burial in England Is Compared to King Tut's Tomb


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Archaeologists are expected to reveal to the public what is now believed to be one of the most significant archaeological finds in England in recent decades. They will announce their findings of a magnificent royal burial , which has been compared to the grave of the famous Egyptian Pharaoh, Tutankhamun. It is expected to change how we view Anglo-Saxon England .

The burial was found during a project to extend a motorway and was discovered by construction workers on a patch of grass next to a congested road. It was not a promising place to find historic treasure , as it is near an ordinary pub and a busy supermarket. The discovery was made outside Prittlewell in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, in 2003.

The Prittlewell burial site was discovered in 2003. ( MOLA)

The Prittlewell Burial is a Grave Worthy of a Pharaoh

The workers notified the relevant authorities, which is required by law. Archaeologists began to investigate the area, in order to prevent looting, and what they found was astounding. They unearthed a large burial chamber that was replete with many grave goods . The Guardian reports that Sophie Jackson, from the Museum of London Archaeology, as stating that “it could be seen as a British equivalent to Tutankhamun’s tomb , although different in a number of ways.”

The chamber was investigated for over 15 years, by a team of 40 experts and researchers and their amazing conclusions are now being revealed for the first time.

The burial chamber, “which would have measured about 13 feet (4 meters) square and 5 feet (1.5 meters) deep,” according to the BBC, held a variety of many precious artifacts. Archaeologists retrieved some forty artifacts from the Anglo-Saxon world and beyond. Among the items that were recovered was an intact lyre, a musical instrument , which is decorated with semi-precious stones that came possibly from India.

At the Prittlewell burial the remains of a lyre with decorative copper-ally fitting with garnets in the center. ( MOLA)

There was also found a complete painted wooden box, the first of its kind ever found from the Anglo-Saxon world. The hoard included coins, drinking horns, and wooden vessels and a golden buckle was also unearthed. The BBC reports that “a flagon believed to have come from Syria” was also among the grave goods. Such riches in the chamber led to the comparisons with the Tomb of Tutankhamun.

Objects found at the Prittlewell burial site include a gold belt buckle, a copper alloy flagon from the Mediterranean, a decorative hanging bowl, and gold coins. ( MOLA)

Because of the nature of the soil, all the carbon-based material has long-ago disintegrated and the burial site was only a sandy pit when it was revealed to the light for the first time. The remains of the person interred there had also disappeared. Only some teeth remained but they had precious DNA.

Carbon-dating revealed that the burial was from “between 575 AD and 605 AD”, states the Guardian. This was when the Anglo-Saxons had established a number of kingdoms in eastern England and had driven the Romano-Britons to the remote highlands of Wales and Cornwall.

Is the Prittlewell Burial the Grave of Prince Seaxa?

Then the researchers began to try to identify the person buried in the remarkable grave. Their initial hypothesis was that it was King Saebert, who was a ruler in the East of England in the early 7 th century AD. However, Saebert died in 616 AD according to the Chronicles and the burial dated from approximately 580 AD. The researchers then concluded that the person buried in the grave was Seaxa, the younger sibling of King Saebert, but this cannot be established for certain.

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The Prittlewell burial site by the side of a road in Essex, believed to be that of Seaxa brother of King Saebert. ( MOLA)

Experts from the Museum of London Archaeology believe that the person was probably a member of royalty and this gives credence to the theory that it was Seaxa. It took a large number of men to build the chamber and it required timber from over a dozen oaks and this is an indication of the dead man’s very high-status. Locals have called the man the ‘Prince of Prittlewell’ because of the many precious items found with him.

Evidence of Early Adoption of Christianity Found At the Prittlewell Burial Site

Among all the riches that were found in the chamber were a number of small “gold foil crosses” reports Sky News . This is possible evidence that the deceased was a Christian or at least partially Christianized. These finds are surprising, and they indicate that the Anglo-Saxons or at least some of them had adopted Christianity even before the mission of St. Augustine in the 7 th century AD. The crosses could have been placed there by Seaxa’s mother, who was a Christian, from Gaul. According to Sky News , the chamber is “the earliest Christian Anglo-Saxon royal burial site” so far uncovered.

Gold crosses believed to have been placed over the man’s eyes found at the Prittlewell burial site. ( MOLA)

The find is demonstrating that Essex in England was an important center for the Germanic tribes and that they had at the very least contacts with Christianity far earlier than thought. It also shows the area’s wealth in the so-called Dark Ages and that the local population engaged in long-distance trade.

Some of the grave goods are going to be put on display over the summer at the Central Museum in Southend.


Southend burial site 'UK's answer to Tutankhamun'

Workers unearthed the grave, which contained dozens of rare artefacts, during roadworks in Prittlewell, near Southend, Essex, in 2003.

Tooth enamel fragments were the only human remains, but experts say their "best guess" is that they belonged to a 6th Century Anglo-Saxon prince.

It is said to be the oldest example of a Christian Anglo-Saxon royal burial.

Now, after 15 years of expert analysis some of the artefacts are returning to Southend to go on permanent display for the first time at the Central Museum.

When a team from the Museum of London Archaeology (Mola) excavated the site, they said they were "astounded" to find the burial chamber intact.


English Version of King Tut’s Tomb Found Behind an Aldi Store

The finds inside the burial site are pretty spectacular.

There are vast numbers of ancient burial sites around the world which we will never find or explore. But, one town in the UK has been the site of extensive archaeological work on a tomb of late antiquity which was discovered in 2003 as part of a road improvement project. Researchers have found the jackpot of Anglo-Saxon burials in this gold-laden grave. While the archaeological site was discovered long ago, excavations on the area have now really shown what all was in the tomb and the results are pretty spectacular.

The work of 40 people over more than 15 years, sifting through hundreds of artifacts from the 6th or 7th century, was undertaken by the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) and the research shows that the man inside the tomb would have been quite privileged and wealthy in life. Some have suspected he was a king, even going so far as to call him the “King of Bling” and musing that the tomb was that of Saebert, King of Essex, but the carbon dating showed the tomb was constructed long before his death. But, now researchers think the tomb may have actually been created for Saebert’s brother, Seaxa.

The tomb represents a combination of Christian burial practices and older pagan rituals. Gold crosses (probably placed over the eyes of the corpse) showed not only status, but also that he had links to Christianity. While this is very early for Christianity in England, the ruling family at the time had a few Christians who had married into the family from other parts of Europe. These new members would have had knowledge of Christian customs. On the other hand the burial mound filled with items that a man of nobility might want in the afterlife speaks strongly to pagan beliefs about what happens when a person dies.

Inside the tomb was a sword, many drinking vessels, pots, and a folding chair of the type that a nobleman might give orders from. Based on these finds it does seem like the people who buried him were trying to get him set up in the afterlife. Renderings of what the tomb may have looked like certainly show how the burial room was set up to honor a person of very high birth on their final journey.

The well-drained, sandy nature of the soil meant that the bodily remains of the occupant had decayed and washed away. The only human remains on the site were fragments of tooth enamel, which of course takes much longer to break down. However, the many metal ornaments, bowls, and instruments at the tomb were preserved in the soil. MOLA director, Sophie Jackson, in a press conference compared the burial and accompanying grave goods to the discovery of King Tut’s tomb.

Engraved gold lips topped wooden drinking vessels made of wood and horn, a copper alloy decanter, coins, decorative glass beakers, remnants of a lyre, and a gold belt buckle were among the many treasures that were found in the tomb, buried under a mound decorated with stones on top.

The MOLA has now created an interactive online site where you can explore the tomb in detail, and see all the finds for yourself and exactly where they were found inside the tomb. The objects themselves will be on display at the Southend Central Museum beginning in May of of 2019.


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“There are luxury imports that have come from as far away as Syria. Some of the raw materials might have even come as far away as Sri Lanka and the Indian subcontinent,” said Liz Barham, a senior conservator at Museum of London Archaeology who worked on the dig.

“This is a really rich burial. It’s a statement, it’s a theatrical statement being made about the family, about this person.”

Sophie Jackson, director of research and engagement at Museum of London Archaeology, said the discovery is “our equivalent of Tutankhamun’s tomb.” While the identity of its occupant is unknown, locals have nicknamed him the “Prittlewell Prince.”

Fragments of tooth enamel — the only human remains uncovered — revealed he was over six years old, and the size of the coffin suggests he was about 5 foot 8 inches (1.73 metres) tall.

Jackson said the “best guess” is that it was Seaxa, brother of King Saebert, the first Anglo-Saxon king to convert to Christianity.

She said the burial came at a time when Christianity was vying in Britain with older pagan beliefs.

“They would have been just on the transition between having pagan burials with all your gear, but also having these crosses,” she said.

A painted wooden box fragment, claimed to be the only surviving example of early Anglo-Saxon painted woodwork, on display at Southend Central Museum in Southend, England, Thursday, May 8, 2019. Photo by James Brooks / AP

The Anglo-Saxons were descendants of Germanic tribes who gradually invaded England by sea starting in the fifth century, after the collapse of the Roman Empire. They came to rule the country until the Norman conquest in 1066.

Dozens of artifacts will go on show Saturday at Southend Central Museum, near the burial site and about 40 miles (60 km) east of London.


  • The 1,400-year-old tomb was accidentally discovered between a pub and an Aldi
  • Archaeologists say it is the most important Anglo-Saxon burial discovery in more than 70 years
  • While the identity of its occupant is unknown, locals have nicknamed him the "Prittlewell Prince"

The chamber, originally uncovered between a road and a railway line in the south-eastern English village of Prittlewell in 2003, has turned out to be a 1,400-year-old tomb.

New details have been published about the finding, which archaeologists say is the most important Anglo-Saxon burial discovery in more than 70 years.

Treasures unearthed at the site include a golden belt buckle, the remnants of a harp-like instrument known as a lyre, gleaming glassware and an elaborate water vessel from the eastern Mediterranean, perhaps Syria.

Researchers say the luxury items indicate the chamber's occupant was a man of high standing, possibly a prince.

Two small gold-foil crosses found at the head of the coffin suggest a Christian burial.

"There are luxury imports that have come from as far away as Syria. Some of the raw materials might have even come as far away as Sri Lanka and the Indian subcontinent," said Liz Barham, a senior conservator at Museum of London Archaeology who worked on the dig.

"This is a really rich burial. It's a statement, it's a theatrical statement being made about the family, about this person."

Sophie Jackson, director of research and engagement at Museum of London Archaeology, said the discovery is "our equivalent of Tutankhamun's tomb".

While the identity of its occupant is unknown, locals have nicknamed him the "Prittlewell Prince".

Fragments of tooth enamel — the only human remains uncovered — revealed he was over six years old, and the size of the coffin suggests he was about 5 foot 8 inches (1.73 metres) tall, the average height for an Anglo-Saxon male at the time.

Ms Jackson said the "best guess" is that it was Seaxa, brother of King Saebert, the first Anglo-Saxon king to convert to Christianity.

She said the burial came at a time when Christianity was vying in Britain with older pagan beliefs.

"They would have been just on the transition between having pagan burials with all your gear, but also having these crosses," she said.

The Anglo-Saxons were descendants of Germanic tribes who gradually invaded England by sea starting in the fifth century, after the collapse of the Roman Empire.

They came to rule the country until the Norman conquest in 1066.

Dozens of artefacts will be displayed at Southend Central Museum, near the burial site and about 60 kilometres east of London.


See Stunning Photos of King Tut’s Tomb After a Major Restoration

After almost a decade of painstaking work, conservators in Egypt have revealed the newly revamped tomb of Tutankhamen, better known as King Tut.

In addition to cleaning and restoring the paintings that adorn the walls of the tomb, the combined efforts of the Getty Conservation Institute and the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities focused on combating the wear and tear sustained through decades of tourist activity, and protecting it from further decay and deterioration.

The 12th pharaoh of the 18th Egyptian dynasty, Tutankhamen (or Tutankhamun) became king of Egypt when he was only nine years old. He ruled for less than a decade, from approximately 1332 to 1323 B.C., before dying mysteriously at the age of 19. Experts now believe he contracted gangrene from an infected leg wound.

Despite his short reign, King Tut has become the most famous of all Egypt’s pharaohs thanks to the splendour of his tomb, which was first discovered in 1922 by the British archaeologist Howard Carter. The entrance to the tomb, located in the famous Valley of the Kings, had been concealed by debris, and remained hidden for 3,000 years after the pharaoh’s death.

When Carter and his fellow archaeologist, George Herbert, Lord Carnarvon, entered, they found the tomb and its contents largely intact, including marvelous paintings, grave goods such as jewelry, statues, oils and perfumes and three coffins nestled inside each other, with the innermost gold coffin containing King Tut’s mummy.

King Tut’s tomb quickly became one of Egypt’s top tourist attractions, welcoming as many as 4,000 tourists a day by the late 1980s. By that time, experts had grown concerned about the effects of such heavy tourism on the burial chamber. In addition to carrying in dust from their clothing and shoes, some visitors even scratched graffiti on the tomb’s surfaces. Meanwhile, the flood of humid air and carbon dioxide into what had been a closed space for thousands of years had caused a large amount of what looked like microbiological or fungal growth, in the form of mysterious brown spots spreading across the walls.

Beginning in 2009, in cooperation with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, the Getty Conservation Institute undertook the multi-year conservation effort of King Tut’s tomb. The team of conservators cleaned and treated the wall paintings, removing years of dust that had accumulated.

When the conservators compared photographs of the tomb walls to historic images taken shortly after Carter’s discovery, they found to their surprise that the number of brown spots on the walls had grown little since the mid-1920s. Through DNA tests and chemical analysis they confirmed that though the spots were in fact microbiological, they were dead, and no longer spreading. Because they had already penetrated beneath the surface of the paint layer, they chose not to remove them. 

According to Lorinda Wong, a project specialist at the Getty, the microbiological growth is completely unique to Tut’s tomb, and may have to do with the way in which he was buried.

Finally, the team of conservators also constructed additional barriers to restrict direct visitor access to the tomb’s walls and installed ventilation and filtration systems to help limit the effects of humidity and dust brought in by visitors.

"Conservation and preservation is important for the future and for this heritage and this great civilization to live forever,” said Zahi Hawass, Egyptologist and former minister of State for Antiquities in Egypt, in a statement. 

King Tut’s tomb remained open to visitors during the project, and remains one of Egypt’s most popular tourist attractions. In general, public fascination with Tut shows no sign of letting up: In 2018, new evidence emerged that the Boy King (once thought to be weak and sickly) may have in fact been a soldier. Also, archaeologists confirmed that there are no secret chambers hidden in Tut’s tomb, squashing hopes of finding the long-lost tomb of Nefertiti, or some other Egyptian VIP. 

The next project is the restoration of the outermost coffin of King Tutankhamen. The restoration of the golden coffin is expected to take seven to nine months.


English Version of King Tut’s Tomb Found Behind an Aldi Store

The finds inside the burial site are pretty spectacular.

There are vast numbers of ancient burial sites around the world which we will never find or explore. But, one town in the UK has been the site of extensive archaeological work on a tomb of late antiquity which was discovered in 2003 as part of a road improvement project. Researchers have found the jackpot of Anglo-Saxon burials in this gold-laden grave. While the archaeological site was discovered long ago, excavations on the area have now really shown what all was in the tomb and the results are pretty spectacular.

The work of 40 people over more than 15 years, sifting through hundreds of artifacts from the 6th or 7th century, was undertaken by the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) and the research shows that the man inside the tomb would have been quite privileged and wealthy in life. Some have suspected he was a king, even going so far as to call him the “King of Bling” and musing that the tomb was that of Saebert, King of Essex, but the carbon dating showed the tomb was constructed long before his death. But, now researchers think the tomb may have actually been created for Saebert’s brother, Seaxa.

The tomb represents a combination of Christian burial practices and older pagan rituals. Gold crosses (probably placed over the eyes of the corpse) showed not only status, but also that he had links to Christianity. While this is very early for Christianity in England, the ruling family at the time had a few Christians who had married into the family from other parts of Europe. These new members would have had knowledge of Christian customs. On the other hand the burial mound filled with items that a man of nobility might want in the afterlife speaks strongly to pagan beliefs about what happens when a person dies.

Inside the tomb was a sword, many drinking vessels, pots, and a folding chair of the type that a nobleman might give orders from. Based on these finds it does seem like the people who buried him were trying to get him set up in the afterlife. Renderings of what the tomb may have looked like certainly show how the burial room was set up to honor a person of very high birth on their final journey.

The well-drained, sandy nature of the soil meant that the bodily remains of the occupant had decayed and washed away. The only human remains on the site were fragments of tooth enamel, which of course takes much longer to break down. However, the many metal ornaments, bowls, and instruments at the tomb were preserved in the soil. MOLA director, Sophie Jackson, in a press conference compared the burial and accompanying grave goods to the discovery of King Tut’s tomb.

Engraved gold lips topped wooden drinking vessels made of wood and horn, a copper alloy decanter, coins, decorative glass beakers, remnants of a lyre, and a gold belt buckle were among the many treasures that were found in the tomb, buried under a mound decorated with stones on top.

The MOLA has now created an interactive online site where you can explore the tomb in detail, and see all the finds for yourself and exactly where they were found inside the tomb. The objects themselves will be on display at the Southend Central Museum beginning in May of of 2019.


Britain’s answer to Tutankhamun tomb found in burial site at Aldi in Southend, Essex

A ROYAL burial site found next to a branch of Aldi in Essex is Britain’s answer to Tutankhamun’s tomb.

The grave, under a verge near a railway in Southend, is thought to be that of Seaxa, brother of Anglo-Saxon King Saebert.

Around 40 artefacts found inside led archaeologists to conclude it is a royal grave — and one of the most significant finds in British history.

The discovery in Essex - now more famous for the reality show Towie that features nightclub The Sugar Hut - includes a complete lyre and a 1,400-year-old painted wooden box, the only one of its kind to be found in Britain.

Expert Sophie Jackson said: “It was such an unpromising looking site. It’s between a bit of railway and a bit of road. I think it's our equivalent’of Tutankhamun's tomb.”

The site was found during road-widening work between a pub and the Aldi in Prittlewell, Southend, in 2003. The burial chamber is 13ft-square and 5ft deep.

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Experts reckon it would have taken more than three months to build. Carbon dating tests on male remains inside revealed he died between 575AD and 605AD.

That ruled out the body being that of King Saebert, who died in 616AD. Ms Jackson, of the Museum of London Archaeology, said it was possible it was the king’s brother, Seaxa, adding: “That’s the best guess.”

But one Aldi shopper said: “Because we are in Essex you’d think the artefacts must have included gold chains and medallions.”

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The Great Tutankhamen Hoax – Was the Tomb of King Tut Faked?

Tutankhamen, the boy king whose tomb was famously discovered in 1922 by LordC arnarvon and Howard Carter, is arguably the most famous pharaoh in Egyptian history. Every child and adult alike has heard about King Tut, and Carter and Carnarvon have both gone down in history and folklore due to the artefacts they uncovered in the Valley of the Kings.

And today, just years away from the 100 year anniversary of the discovery, we continue to learn more and more about the finds. But when you put the information together, when you logically look at the tomb of King Tut, something is clearly very wrong and I’m not talking about the fabled curse. Far from being the greatest historical discovery of all time, have we actually been taken in by greatest historical #hoax of all time?

Renegade

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Inside ‘British version of Tutankhamun’s tomb’ discovered between a pub and an Aldi

Archaeologists have recreated in painstaking detail what they called the UK’s answer to Tutankhamun’s tomb – a royal burial site dating back to Anglo-Saxon times discovered by the side of a road in Essex.

They believe the burial chamber, unearthed near a pub and an Aldi supermarket, may have held the remains of Seaxa, brother of King Saebert.

Scientists have spent 15 years excavating the site in Prittlewell, Southend-on-Sea. They have pieced together artefacts, some of which are 1,400 years old, to build a new picture of how the chamber looked when it was first created.

Newly analysed objects suggest the tomb is older than previously thought, ruling out a previous hypothesis that it housed the deceased king himself.

Researchers at the Museum of London Archaeology (Mola) estimated the structure took 113 working days to build, representing “a huge investment in skilled labour, as well as materials”.

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

1 /8 ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

ɻritish version of Tutankhamun’s tomb' found in Essex - in pictures

The site was the earliest Christian Anglo-Saxon princely burial found in the UK, said research director, Sophie Jackson.

She added: “I think it’s our equivalent of Tutankhamun’s tomb. Getting an intact version of this and seeing how everything is positioned and what he’s got with him. I think the thing that’s so strange about it is that it was such an unpromising-looking site. It’s between a bit of railway and a bit of road, essentially a verge. It’s not where you’d expect to find it.”

Work began on the site in 2003, and among the items discovered were a painted box, drinking horns and a flagon originating from the Byzantine empire, as well as gold foil crosses, suggesting the dead male had converted to Christianity.

The box is the only surviving example of painted Anglo-Saxon woodwork in Britain.

The male, believed to have been at least adolescent in age, would have stood about 5ft 8in when he died around the year 580, researchers said. Missionaries sent by Pope Gregory I to convert the Anglo-Saxons only landed in Kent in 597.

Saebert died in about 616, meaning the tomb cannot be his. Experts used organic material from drinking horns found inside for radio-carbon dating.

A team of 40 worked on the project, funded by Southend-on-Sea Borough Council and Historic England.

The find and subsequent research has helped “transform our understanding of [Anglo-Saxons’] early history”, Professor Simon Keynes of Trinity College, Cambridge, told The Independent.

“Prittlewell was from the moment of its discovery in 2003 seen to be something very special, which would do for the East Saxons what Sutton Hoo has been doing since 1939 for the East Angles: cast new light on the elite, as shown by their burial customs, during the period of their conversion to Christianity in the late sixth and early seventh centuries,” he said.

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He added: “We know the basic story from Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People, written in 731, but Sutton Hoo and Prittlewell give us the material evidence, in the form of the elite or princely burial rituals, which take us closer to the material realities at this elevated level of society. Finds like Sutton Hoo, Prittlewell, and the Staffordshire Hoard add the dimensions which only material evidence of this kind can provide.”

Sutton Hoo in Suffolk is a hugely significant archaeological area where a trove of Anglo-Saxon artefacts and graves have been found since its discovery in 1939. The Staffordshire Hoard, unearthed near Lichfield in 2009, is the largest-ever find of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver artefacts, numbering some 4,000.

Objects from the Prittlewell site are due to go on permanent display at Southend Central Museum from 11 May, having previously been shown around the world.

Additional reporting by Press Association


Watch the video: Britains Answer to Tutankhamun Discovered - An Undisturbed Tomb of an Anglo-Saxon Prince (July 2022).


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